Learning Activities

How can you bring the International Day of the Girl and the issues facing girls into the classroom?

Ages 7-11

Little girl sitting down on steps while holding a purple binder.
  • Learn about some of the challenges facing girls around the world, like malnutrition or access to education. 
  • Invite students to explore or learn about one of the Canadian girls featured in Strong Girls, like Ann Makosinski who, when she was just 15-years old, invented a hollow flashlight that is powered by the heat of the hand that is holding it; or Susanna Manziaris who, at 15-years old, created Girls Helping Girls, a charity dedicated to improving the status of women through education around the world.
  • Invite a guest speaker from a local service or development organization to talk to students about the challenges facing girls in the community or abroad and what can be done to help them.
  • Work together as a class to research and raise funds for a charity that assists girls; organize a school-wide fundraising event that raises awareness of girls' rights.
  • Draw a picture of the school supplies used at school and discuss the difficulties students would have if they did not have the tools they needed, or even a school to attend. What challenges might they encounter?

Ages 12-13

  • Screen a video related to the themes of International Day of the Girl and initiate a class discussion about the issues explored. See the resource list for some video options.
  • Have students write a short creative piece describing a day in the life of a girl facing one of the issues listed in the discussion topics
  • Invite a guest speaker from a local service or development organization to talk to students about the challenges facing girls in the community or abroad and what can be done to help them.
  • Ask students to prepare and present a skit exploring what youth can do to help overcome one of the challenges facing girls.
  • Have students work in groups to brainstorm what they can do to support girls' rights and well-being; write down the suggestions and display them in a public area of the school.
  • Invite students to explore the profiles of Strong Girls on our website; ask them to write or present a short report on a girl who inspires them.
  • Ask students to prepare a visual art piece or collage depicting what girls' rights means to them.
  • Make students "school ambassadors" for International Day of the Girl; task them with telling their peers about this special day and the reasons for celebrating it (e.g. students could send an e-card to their friends and family, make a short presentation to other classes, post on social media using the #dayofthegirl hashtag, etc.)

Ages 14-17

Smiling girl sitting on a park bench, holding an open book.
  • Using the list of discussion topics ask students to debate one of the issues that girls face.
  • Ask students to write an essay exploring one of the discussion topics and/or proposing solutions to the issue discussed.
  • Ask students to choose a subject from the list of discussion topics to research; have students present their findings to the class.
  • Ask students to prepare a short video that explores one of the issues faced by girls.
  • Work together as a class to research and raise funds for a charity that assists girls; organize a school-wide fundraising event that raises awareness of girls' rights.
  • Have students volunteer at or visit a service organization that works with girls; ask them to write or present a short report on their experience.
  • Ask students to name the issues that girls face in their school and propose solutions; have the class choose one or two of the proposed solutions and lead their implementation in the school (e.g. students may choose to address bullying and harassment by launching an awareness campaign that includes displaying posters throughout the school and making public service announcements over the P.A. system).
  • Ask students to start and/or participate in a social media campaign that promotes International Day of the Girl and girls' rights; ask students to use social media to share thoughts or images (using the #dayofthegirl hashtag) and to connect with others from around the world who share an interest in girls' rights.
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