Introduction to GBA+

Sex and gender - video

Video Transcript

Video Transcript

Beyond sex and gender

NARRATOR: We’ve all heard it: “You can’t really understand another person’s experience until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes.” A pair of shoes are walking across the top of the screen. The shoes transform into different styles: sneakers, pumps, and loafers.
TEXT ON SCREEN –
WE’VE ALL HEARD IT
CAN’T UNDERSTAND
EXPERIENCE
WALKED A MILE IN THEIR SHOES
Shoes aren’t one-size-fits-all and neither are policies, programs and services.

The shoes walking across top of screen transform into the bottom portion of a wheelchair moving forward. The green sneakers of the person in the wheelchair are visible.
TEXT ON SCREEN –
SHOES AREN’T ONE-SIZE-FITS-ALL
POLICIES PROGRAMS SERVICES
A document icon appears above the word policy
A medical syringe icon appears the word programs
A service desk icon appears above the word services

That’s what gender-based analysis plus (or G-B-A-+) is all about. Animated logo for GBA+ appears So, how does it work? TEXT ON SCREEN - HOW DOES GBA+ WORK?   Doing a gender-based analysis means gathering information on how different groups of people may experience the same situation differently.  Stairs with 3 steps appear. A stick-figure with a briefcase walks up the stairs. A stick-figure holding a cane rises out of the top step. Another stick-figure walks up the stairs. Another stick-figure pushing a stroller stops at the bottom step and looks up.
TEXT ON SCREEN –
GATHERING INFORMATION appears on the riser of the top step.
DIFFERENT GROUPS OF PEOPLE appears on the riser of the middle step.
EXPERIENCE THE SAME SITUATION DIFFERENTLY appears on the riser of the bottom step.
This is your chance to identify risks and opportunities as you design your initiative… and create appropriate mitigation strategies.

A city scene forms in the background. A stick-figure walks down a road and encounters a road-sign with an exclamation mark on it to represent the word: risk. The exclamation mark is replaced by the GBA+ logo. A thought bubble appears above the stick-figure. Inside the thought bubble, an icon of a pen drawing a line appears. The line is then replaced by an icon of a document.
TEXT ON SCREEN –
RISKS AND OPPORTUNITIES
DESIGN YOUR INITIATIVE
MITIGATION STRATEGIES

Let’s start at the beginning. What makes you who you are? Is it your age? Your ethnic background? Where you live? A stick figure appears on screen next to the text: “What makes you who you are?” A pair of shoes are walking across the top of the screen. The shoes transform into different styles : sneakers, pumps, loafers. Then the bottom portion of a wheelchair moving forward replaces the shoes. The green sneakers of the person in the wheelchair are visible. Then walking sneakers replace the wheelchair again.
An icon of a flipping calendar appears to represent the word: age. A spinning globe replaces the calendar to represent the words: ethnic background, where you live.
TEXT ON SCREEN –
WHAT MAKES YOU WHO YOU ARE?
AGE
ETHNIC BACKGROUND
WHERE YOU LIVE
It’s all of this and more. These are called identity factors.

Sex and gender are two identity factors that are the starting points for GBA+. TEXT ON SCREEN – The words: IDENTITY FACTORS appears as flip-clock letters in a box with an open lid.
TEXT ON SCREEN – The words: AGE, ETHNIC BACKGROUND, WHERE YOU LIVE fall into the box and the lid closes.
TEXT ON SCREEN - The words: IDENTITY FACTORS flip to become the words: SEX GENDER
The terms “sex” and “gender” are often used interchangeably but they are actually separate concepts.

TEXT ON SCREEN - The words: SEX GENDER appear and disappear above and below a horizontal line.
A box is drawn around the word SEX and a separate box is drawn around the word GENDER.

Sex refers to a set of biological attributes and is associated with physical and physiological features. The box containing the word sex in it moves to the center of the screen and 6 icons appear around it. The 6 icons are: DNA strands, a brain, molecules, lungs, gender symbols and a heart. Sex is usually categorized as female or male but there is variation in biological attributes and how those attributes are expressed.

TEXT ON SCREEN – The words: FEMALE MALE appear and then drop and disappear into a horizontal line. The words: VARIATION BIOLOGICAL ATTRIBUTES rise up out of the same line.
One stick-figure appears, and then more stick-figures, including 2 stick-figures in wheelchairs.

Gender, on the other hand, refers to the socially constructed roles, behaviours, expressions and identities of individuals. TEXT ON SCREEN – The word GENDER appears in a box. The following words appear around the box: SOCIALLY CONSTRUCTED ROLES, BEHAVIOURS, EXPRESSIONS, IDENTITIES Gender helps determine how people perceive themselves and each other and how they act and interact. A spinning globe appears and the box containing the word GENDER centres over the globe. Stick-figures appear around it.
TEXT ON SCREEN - ACT AND INTERACT
It can even have an impact on how power and resources are distributed in a society.

A new spinning globe appears with trees, shrubs, windmills, city buildings, houses, mountains and clouds appearing around the globe.
TEXT ON SCREEN – The words IMPACT POWER RESOURCES appear on the globe.
Visit Status of Women Canada and check out our Demystifying GBA+ job aid on GCpedia.
Information is available upon request for those outside the Government of Canada.
TEXT ON SCREEN - Adapted from Canadian Institutes of Health Research, CIHR Institute of Gender and Health, Sex, Gender and Health Research Guide: A Tool for CIHR Applicants, http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/32019.html, 2016. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, 2017.

 
An example of gender norms in Canada

An example of gender norms in Canada

Despite their increased participation in the Canadian workforce, women still act as the primary caregivers of both children and the elderly in the home. We assume women will be the main caregivers (in heterosexual couples) not because of their sex (biology), but because we see caregiving as part of their role as the female parent (socially defined in an assumed heterosexual couple), and a culturally-constructed association between femininity and nurturing. The uneven burden of caregiving in Canada has economic and health outcome repercussions for women, including contributing to the gender-wage gap. In addition, policies that overlook the role of men as primary caregivers and nurturers perpetuate gender stereotypes that are harmful to men as well as women.