2012-13 Departmental Performance Report

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This table presents SWC's strategic outcome, Equality for women and their full participation in the economic, social and democratic life of Canada, the three performance indicators for that outcome and the Actual Results achieved.

Strategic Outcome: Equality for women and their full participation in the economic, social and democratic life of Canada
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Representation of women in senior decision-making positions in public and private sectors

Representation of women in the labour market, including access to support programs and services for entrepreneurship

Participation of women in political processes/systems at the local, provincial and federal levels
1% increase per year

1% increase per year

1% increase per year
Note: In 2012-13, SWC took measures to update its Management of Resources and Results Structure, including its strategic outcome and Program Alignment Architecture, which will come into effect in 2013-14. These amendments are designed to streamline the agency's performance, defining its sphere of influence with concrete and measurable results that can be used to assess progress toward its strategic outcome.

In 2012-13, progress toward SWC's strategic outcome was assessed through the results achieved in key areas, such as; increased awareness and enhanced capacity, engagement by women and men in efforts to promote gender equality, women's participation in their communities, networks and partnerships created through SWC interventions, collaboration among key players to address a range of issues pertaining to gender equality.

2.1 Programs and Sub-Programs

2.1.1: Strategic Policy Analysis, Planning and Development

Program Description

SWC provides strategic policy analysis, advice and tools to support federal departments and central agencies in identification of policy priorities and in integrating Gender-based Analysis in existing and proposed policies, programs and initiatives. This is done through collaboration with other federal departments, provincial-territorial governments, civil society and key international partners.

This table summarizes, in millions, financial resources for Program 1.1: total budgetary expenditures, planned spending, total authorities, actual spending and the Difference between planned and actual spending for 2012-13.  

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1.8 1.8 1.9 2.1 (0.3)

This table summarizes, in full-time equivalents, human resources for Program 1.1:  planned, actual, and the difference between planned and actual staffing for 2012-13.  

Human Resources – Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
17 18 (1)

This table highlights the expected results, performance indicators, targets and Actual Results for Program 1.1.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual
Results
  • Increased policy effectiveness in addressing women's issues and advancing gender equality
  • Sustainable capacity of federal government departments to apply GB
  • Increased integration of women's issues in the formulation of policies and programs
Number of departments that respond to women's issues effectively through policy/program formulation and implementation

Percentage of other government departments with increased capacity to incorporate GBA+ into their policy and program activities

Number of new and improved policies and programs that respond to women's issues
3-5 departments per year

3-5 departments per year 

3-5 policies per year
Over 30 federal organizations benefited from SWC training, advice and support which sought to ensure the incorporation of gender considerations in programs, policies and other initiatives. This is in addition to SWC-led work to build awareness and disseminate information to advance gender equality.

Ten additional departments participated in the Departmental Action Plan on GBA.

Over 500 people, 80% from the public service, completed the online training in GBA+, with a satisfaction rate of over 90%.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, SWC focused its efforts on building synergies, leveraging partnerships and ensuring progress toward gender equality. As highlighted below, there is evidence of demonstrable results in key areas, advancing toward the strategic outcome.

Addressing violence against women and girls: As a knowledge broker, SWC continued to equip key stakeholders with information, tools and strategies by:

  • launching a website showcasing practical resources and tips to address violence against women and girls, and an online advertising campaign, “Do Something”, designed to educate Canadians on how they can help end gender-based violence;
  • supporting the release of Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends, which was published in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Forum of Ministers Responsible for the Status of Women. This updated resource informs Canadians about the prevalence, scope and economic impact of violence against women and girls; and
  • leading Canada's delegation to the 57th Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, which focused on eliminating violence against women and girls. The Canadian delegation played an active role in ensuring the adoption of agreed-upon conclusions. SWC also facilitated discussions among nations on the importance of engaging men and boys in violence prevention, the unique risk factors and responses to violence in the name of so-called “honour” and the critical role of the health sector in responding to violence.

Increasing women's representation in leadership roles: SWC raised awareness about the benefits of and strategies to increase the representation of women on boards. In partnership with the FPT Forum, SWC co-hosted a “Women on Boards” knowledge exchange featuring leading experts on the subject. SWC also supported the creation of an advisory council of leaders from the private and public sectors to promote the participation of women on corporate boards in line with the Economic Action Plan 2012 commitment.

Empowering Girls: On October 11, 2012, SWC marked the inaugural International Day of the Girl, using the date as a catalyst to build partnerships, raise awareness about girls' potential and explore ways to address the challenges facing them. With SWC's support, Girls Action Foundation produced the report, Beyond Appearances: Brief on the Main Issues Facing Girls in Canada, which can be accessed through SWC's website.

Strengthening implementation of GBA: SWC continued to lead the promotion of Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+), supporting over 30 federal departments and agencies during the reporting year.

Through the Departmental Action Plan on GBA, SWC worked with 10 federal organizations, in the public safety and science fields promoting the integration of this practice across the federal administration. With the training of over 500 people, mostly from the public service, who completed the first interactive online GBA+ course, there is evidence of enhanced capacity across the federal public sector. The course has also generated substantial cost savings for the federal government. The launch of the government-wide GBA+ Awareness Week featured learning events as well as communication activities to increase visibility of GBA+ across federal departments and agencies.

2.1.2 Women's Participation in Canadian Society

Program Description

Women's Participation in Canadian Society is delivered through the Women's Program. It strengthens women's full participation by addressing their economic and social situations and their participation in democratic life through financial and professional assistance for community-based projects and through strategic partnerships that leverage resources involving public institutions and non-governmental organizations.

This table summarizes, in millions, financial resources for Program 1.2: total budgetary expenditures, planned spending, total authorities, actual spending and the difference between planned and for 2012-13.  

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
24.2 24.2 24.4 22.5 1.7

This table summarizes, in full-time equivalents, human resources for Program 1.2: planned, actual, and the difference between planned and actual staffing for 2012-13.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
32 35 (3)

For Program 1.2, this table highlights the results expected, the performance indicators, the targets and actual results achieved for the year 2012-13.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual
Results
Increased participation of women in their communities Proportion of funded projects that demonstrate level of women's participation in their communities 10% of projects 80% of the projects contributed to increased participation of women in their communities.*

*Since the establishment of this target, there has been a significant program refocus to increase the impact of projects at the community level. This explains why the vast majority of program projects (80%) fall into this category. The remainder of the projects would have a focus on capacity-building, network development, sector-specific strategies, etc.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, SWC worked to help create conditions for success for women in Canada by investing strategically, facilitating networks, and supporting partnerships. The agency provided a total of $18,801,754 to support 315 active projects at the local, regional and national levels to address barriers to women's full participation in Canadian society. There is evidence that these investments make a real difference in the lives of women and girls in Canada. Strategies are yielding concrete results in leveraging partnerships and funding from partners, raising awareness, and increasing and strengthening women's participation in their communities. SWC facilitated networking among organizations; developed partnerships with federal partners to address horizontal issues impacting women and girls; shared knowledge; and assisted organizations to gain access to expertise, resources and tools.

Addressing violence against women and girls: SWC launched a call for proposals as a response to a Speech from the Throne commitment to “address the problem of violence against women and girls” as well as align with the theme for the 2013 session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. The call solicited applications for projects to address gender-based violence in Canada under four themes: high-risk neighbourhoods, engaging men and boys, addressing violence against women and girls in the name of so-called "honour"; and the trafficking of women and girls. Of note is that the projects under the trafficking theme are piloting a local safety audit guide developed by Public Safety Canada.

Empowering girls: As part of Canada's celebration of the first International Day of the Girl in 2012, a call for proposals was launched to enhance awareness and understanding of girl-specific issues, and bring attention to the situation of girls in communities across Canada. The call solicited applications for projects that promoted equality for girls and young women in two priority areas: leadership and decision-making roles, and economic security and prosperity.

Increasing representation of women in leadership roles: In alignment with the Government of Canada's Economic Action Plan and Budget 2012, SWC launched its first “by invitation” call to increase the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women in leadership positions in the technology sectors. Working with the Information Communications and Technology Council, SWC developed a new model approach. The Council will work with the funded projects as a facilitator within the sector through: collaboration, dissemination of promising practices, sustainability of outcomes, and sector-level reform.

Modernizing programs and services for Canadians: SWC improved the management and strengthened accountability of the Program through streamlining its administration with more efficient and structured management strategies.

2.1.3 Internal Services

This table summarizes, in millions, financial resources for Program 1.3: Planned, actual and the difference for 2012-13.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
3.4 5.1 (1.7)

This table summarizes, in full-time equivalents, human resources for Program 1.3: planned, actual and the difference for 2012-13.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
45 41 4
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012-13, SWC addressed recommendations from the Core Control Audit performed by the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) in 2011-2012. This included the implementation of new procedures along with training and the creation and distribution of various tools in the areas of finance and procurement. This has allowed SWC to improve its capacity to meet various Treasury Board policy requirements.

Also in 2012-13, SWC implemented a new agency-wide electronic document management system along with training and the development and distribution of Employee Guidelines for Electronic Document Information Management in line with government direction and requirements.