Planning and Reporting

Results-Based Status Report - Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

Status of Women Canada


Table of Contents

General Information

Summary of Main Results for 2010-2011

Communication Plan

Signatures

Appendices

  1. Acronyms and abbreviations
  2. Status report
  3. Initiatives Undertaken by Official Language Minority Women's Organizations

General Information:

Federal Department/
Agency
Status of Women Canada
MacDonald Building
123 Slater Street, 10th floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 1H9
www.swc-cfc.gc.ca
Minister Responsible
The Honourable Rona Ambrose
Senior official responsible for the implementation of Part VII of the OLA
Suzanne Clément
Coordinator/Head of Agency
Status of Women Canada
Mandate of federal institution
The mandate of Status of Women Canada (SWC) is to "coordinate policy with respect to the status of women and administer related programs." SWC is a federal government organization that promotes the full participation of women in the economic, social and democratic life of Canada. It works to advance equality for women and to remove the barriers to women's participation in society, putting particular emphasis on increasing women's economic security and eliminating violence against women.
National coordinator responsible for implementation of section 41 of the OLA:
Yannick Raymond, Regional Director
Ontario Region
E-mail: Yannick.Raymond@swc-cfc.gc.ca
Regional Coordinators
Suzanne Lacroix, Acting Regional Director
Pacific, West, Prairies and North
Highfield Place
10010 – 106 Street NW, Suite 1001
Edmonton, Alberta
T5J 3L8
E-mail: Suzanne.Lacroix@swc-cfc.gc.ca

Yannick Raymond, Regional Director
Ontario
MacDonald Building
123 Slater Street, 10th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 1H9
E-mail: Yannick.Raymond@swc-cfc.gc.ca

Jill Varley, Regional Director
Quebec and Nunavut
1564 St. Denis Street
Montréal, Québec
H2X 3K2
E-mail: Jill.Varley@swc-cfc.gc.ca

Nicole T. Bujold, Regional Director
Atlantic
33 Weldon St., Unit 230
Moncton, New Brunswick
E1C 0N5
E-mail: Nicole.Bujold@swc-cfc.gc.ca

Summary of Progress Achieved by Status of Women Canada in 2010-2011

Status of Women Canada (SWC) gives great importance to promoting French and English in Canada. Several initiatives show SWC's commitment to promoting the development of official language minority communities (OLMCs) nationwide.

SWC helped ensure that Women's Worlds 2011, an international conference taking place in Ottawa in July 2011, is held in both of Canada's official languages. For three years now, SWC has worked with the organizing committee to ensure that the concerns of marginalized Canadian women and particularly those living in OLMCs are taken into account during the conference. Through the Women's Program (WP), SWC provided $1 million in funding for the Women Build Up to the Forum project. In its preparatory phase, the project enabled 104 organizations and nearly 2,000 women to develop their leadership. The result is that close to 200 women from OLMCs across Canada will participate in the conference.

Again under the Women's Program, SWC provided almost $3 million to women's groups in OLMCs. The different projects funded aim to improve the economic situation of women, promote their participation in democratic institutions or lessen the systemic violence from which they suffer. For example, Action Ontarienne contre la violence faite aux femmes received funding of $539,000 to combat systemic violence against Francophone women in all their diversity in Ontario.

The National Women in Municipal Government Program seeks to strengthen the skills of more than 300 women in 20 Canadian municipalities so that they can stand as candidates in municipal elections, particularly in rural and remote regions. The pilot project of the National Initiative for the Care of the Elderly seeks to create a financial literacy learning model; initially it is helping more than 450 women seniors to improve their economic security. The Girls Action Foundation received $407,000 to help it develop the leadership capacities of 1,000 marginalized girls from different communities in Canada. The Appendix lists other projects funded by SWC under section 41 of the Official Languages Act (OLA).

SWC is carrying on its dialogue with OLMCs to identify their emerging needs and thus better serve them. SWC participated in activities such as the Dialogue au féminin 2010 day held in New Brunswick, and workshops on Francophone immigration throughout the country under the 2011 National Metropolis Conference. Where appropriate, SWC is a member of steering committees on Francophone immigration, which were established by Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

SWC has also helped to promote the vitality of OLMCs through in-house awareness activities, the dissemination of information on the Women's Program, and funding to help OLMCs promote their projects.

Communication Plan

Distribution List

  • SWC Staff
  • Members of the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages
  • Members of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages
  • Members of the Senate Standing Committee on Official Languages
  • Commissioner of Official Languages
  • Official Language Minority Community groups and organizations at national, regional and local levels.

This document is available in downloadable format, on the SWC Web site.

Signatures




Yannick Raymond
Director
Ontario Regional Office
Status of Women Canada




Date




Suzanne Clément
Coordinator/ Head of Agency
Status of Women Canada




Date

Appendices

Appendix 1
Acronyms and Abbreviations

ACFO
Association canadienne-française de l'Ontario

AFO
Assemblée de la francophonie de l'Ontario

NB
New Brunswick

OL
official languages

OLA
Official Languages Act

OLMC
official language minority community

OLMW
official language minority women

SWC
Status of Women Canada

WP
Women's Program

Appendix 2
Status Report

A. Awareness (in-house activities)

Training, information, orientation, awareness, communication and other activities carried out in-house in order to educate employees and/or senior managers of the institution about linguistic duality and the priorities of OLMCs; senior manager performance contracts and recognition program; taking the viewpoint of OLMCs into account during research, studies and investigations.

Expected Result:
Creation of lasting changes in federal institutions re organizational culture; employees and management are aware of and understand their responsibilities regarding section 41 of the Official Languages Act and OLMCs.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs: Indicators to measure the expected result
New employees are informed about obligations resulting from the OLA, as well as their responsibilities concerning the implementation of section 41.

Make use of weekly staff meetings to highlight the advantages resulting from implementation of section 41, linguistic duality and bilingual meetings.
Use of tools, signs and documents in both official languages, services in both languages

Distribution of issues of Bulletin 41-42.

Inclusion of a Blueprint Project funded by SWC in Atlantic Region, in the document A glance at section 41 of the Official Languages Act
All levels of staff are aware of their responsibilities toward OLMCs under section 41.

The majority of meetings at SWC are held in both official languages.
French-speaking breakfasts organized by the Official Languages Champion. Discussions in French Anglophone employees speak French more freely and with greater confidence.
On September 9, 2010, official launch of the video Osez! Dare! produced by the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions. Screening of the video Osez! Dare! Employees are made aware of the importance of using both official languages at work.
Déjà Vu: 40 Years of Language and Laughter in Political Cartoons: Exhibition shown to all staff at a luncheon to mark the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie and the 40th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. Exhibition of cartoons at SWC over a one-week period Employees learn about the key events and political debates that have shaped our approach to official languages since passage of the Official Languages Act.
Mini information campaign on the OLA. Dissemination of 10 facts about the Official Languages Act ("Did you know?") Employees are better informed about the OLA.
Distribution of a Web newsletter on official languages to all staff. Newsletter: Au-delà des mots / Beyond Words Ongoing information reminding staff about the OLA.
On April 28, 2011, Graham Fraser, Commissioner of Official Languages, led an informal bilingual discussion entitled "Reading, writing and interacting in the official language of your choice" at the Canada School of Public Service. The Commissioner of Official Languages presented his recommendations on the Leadership Competencies Profile for Official Languages, an outline of which appears in the report Beyond Bilingual Meetings: Leadership Behaviours for Managers Managers learn strategies helping them to create a workplace conducive to the use of both official languages. They also become familiar with a self-evaluation tool created for themselves and their teams.
Atlantic Region's yearly (2010-2011) strategic planning exercise, which takes into account the diversity of OLMCs and their geographic distribution.

Three employees in the Atlantic Regional Office participated in the [Translation] Day of Dialogue with the Community organized during 2011 OL Week. On the program: workshops and presentations on best practices in three departments (the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Transport Canada and Health Canada).

The Regional Director is a member of SWC's OL Network.

Staff participated in a training session on TERMIUM.
Strategic planning geared to the linguistic reality

Report and notes

Specific examples of best practices and positive measures

Guide for leading workshops

List of participants for networking

Three meetings

Discussions

User guide
Development strategies are prepared for reaching OLMCs in the four Atlantic provinces, and particular attention is given to the OL issue in project analysis by the regional committee reviewing grants and contributions.

In addition to leading a workshop with 10 public servants, the Regional Director and employees held discussions with 29 departments about best practices and positive measures that SWC could use or adapt in the Atlantic Region.

Sharing of best practices and positive measures.

Organization of activities to raise staff awareness.

Better understanding and use of work tools for translation.
B. Consultations (Sharing of ideas and information with OLMCs)

Activities (e.g. committees, discussions, meetings) through which the federal institution consults the OLMCs and dialogues with them to identify their needs and priorities or to understand potential impacts on their development; activities (e.g. round tables, working groups) to explore possibilities for cooperation within the existing mandate of the federal institution or as part of developing a new program or new policy; participation in consultations with OLMCs coordinated by other government bodies; consultation of OLMCs by regional offices to determine their concerns and needs.

Expected Result:
Creation of lasting relationships between the federal institutions and OLMCs; federal institutions and OLMCs understand each other's needs and mandate.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs: Indicators to measure the expected result
Information session offered in the minority official language by teleconference:
  • Algonquin Nation Program and Services Secretariat;
  • Inuit Broadcasting Corporation;
  • Kivalliq Inuit Association;
  • Elisapi Davidee-Aningmiuq; and
  • Cambridge Bay Community Wellness Center.
Information session offered in the minority official language in person:
  • Native Women's Shelter of Montréal;
  • Sken :nen A'onsonton; and
  • Montréal Assault Prevention Centre.
Discussion of issues in connection with ending violence towards women, the prosperity and economic security of women as well as their leadership in society. Many contacts established and re-established, E-mails then received as follow-up, and requests for technical assistance in submitting a funding application.

Telephone requests for information in the minority official language.

Significant growth in the quantity of general information sent to groups working in the minority official language.
Three employees in the Atlantic office participated in the Day of Dialogue with the Community, organized during 2011 OL Week. During the event, the Forum de concertation des organismes acadiens du N.-B. [Cooperation Forum for Acadian Organizations of New Brunswick] presented its Plan de développement global de l'Acadie au N.-B. [Overall Development Plan for the Acadian Region of New Brunswick], while the Regional Executive Director, Atlantic Region, of Canadian Heritage presented the master plan of the NB community-government discussion and cooperation table. All this was followed by workshops at which 85 public servants and 30 representatives of the Francophone community initiated a dialogue. Plan de développement de l'Acadie 2010-2015 available to public servants

Presentations, report and notes

Examples of best practices and positive measures to be used with Francophone groups

List of participants for networking/documentation
In addition to leading a workshop for 15 participants (public servants and representatives of the Francophone community), the Regional Director and employees discussed the needs and expectations of the Francophone community in guided workshops. What was learned could be used or adapted by SWC in the Atlantic Region. This activity also allowed a better understanding of the issues and challenges faced by the Francophone community and the solutions that it advocates.
C. Communications (Transmission of information to OLMCs)

External communications activities to inform OLMCs about the activities, programs and policies of the department/agency and to promote the bilingual character of Canada, inclusion of OLMCs in all information and distribution lists, use of the department's agency's web site to communicate with OLMCs.

Expected Result:
OLMC culture reflects an up-to-date understanding of the federal institution's mandate; OLMCs receive up-to-date and relevant information about the federal institution's programs and services (P&S).
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs: Indicators to measure the expected result
Toll-free numbers and e-mail addresses are available for OLMW across the country to contact SWC staff and access regular and/or relevant news that affects them.

Sending informative E-mails in both official languages to SWC clientele.

Active offer in person, by telephone, by e-mail and in voice messages.

Information sessions were organized on the funding methods, mandate and objectives of the Women's Program.

SWC ensures ongoing communication with OLMCs throughout the country.

SWC helps groups to publicize their activities.

SWC funds groups to help them promote their projects.
Regular calls to toll-free numbers.

Web site.

Guidelines

Information guide and funding application forms

Lists of projects

Meetings

Staff aware of the importance of active offer and Part VII of the OLA

Invitations

Teleconferences

Follow-up

E-mails

Telephone calls
Types of strategic information shared with women's organizations and their minority partners.

Documents are presented in both official languages.

Documents and messages are in both official languages.

Increase in requests for funding from Francophone groups. In total, 17 groups applied to the WP for funding in 2010-2011.

Groups quickly receive an answer to their questions, as well as updates on SWC activities.

Projects benefit a larger number of persons.
D. Coordination and Liaison

(Does not include funding - In-house coordination and relations with other government institutions)

Coordination activities (research, studies, meetings, etc) carried out by the federal institution itself along with other federal institutions or other levels of government; participation in activities organized by other federal institutions, other levels of government, etc.; participation of official languages champions, national and regional coordinators, etc., in various government forums.

Expected Result:
Co-operation with multiple partners to enhance OLMC development and vitality, and to share best practices.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs: Indicators to measure the expected result
Discussions with federal partners at meetings of different federal councils or their partners. Information exchanges Better understanding of the issues of other departments.
Participation of the Official Languages Champion in Linguistic Duality Day on September 9, 2010. Discussions on the importance of promoting and using both official languages at work. The Official Languages Champion helps to advance the Official Languages Program.
SWC participated in different forums organized by the Association canadienne-française de l'Ontario (ACFO) network. Conferences and discussions Better understanding of issues faced by OLMCs in Ontario.
SWC participated in meetings organized by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (four meetings yearly). Conferences and discussions Increased understanding of issues particular to Francophone women immigrants in Ontario.
Participation in the Pre-Conference Session on Francophone Immigration in Canada, preceding the 13th National Metropolis Conference in March 2011 in Vancouver Plenary sessions, round tables and workshops, during which conferences were led by experts on issues related to the phenomenon of migration-immigration Increased understanding of immigration trends, the social, environmental and economic consequences of immigration, and issues that result from the ongoing increase in global migrations and the impact of the immigration on Canada.
SWC participated in the development and implementation of the Plan stratégique communautaire de l'Ontario français 2011-2016 [French Ontario Community Strategic Plan 2011-2016] through "community conversations" with the President of the Assemblée de la francophonie de l'Ontario (AFO). Formal meetings and exchanges between Ontario Francophone communities took place in Mississauga, London, Ottawa and Sudbury Implementation of the Strategic Plan is facilitated and the AFO President better understands the reality of the main players in the local and regional Francophonie, as well as issues that they face daily.
SWC participated in activities of the Union culturelle des Franco-Ontariennes (UCFO) during the year. The Ontario Regional Director participated in the 75th anniversary of UCFO at its 35th Annual General Meeting on June 10 and 11 in Ottawa under the theme "Femme d'abord, Femme à bord" ["Women First, Women on Board"]. Presentations, workshops, exchanges and discussions Helps to make Francophone women of rural Ontario more familiar with SWC's mandate with regard to the prevention of violence against women, raising awareness about violence against women, and women's economic independence.
In October 2010, the Ontario Regional Director participated in the meeting of the steering subcommittee (minority Francophone immigration) and will participate in the next meeting, to be held on February 1, 2011. The meeting brought together representatives of Status of Women Canada, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Canadian Heritage, the Ontario Ministry of Health, Legal Aid Ontario, the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, the Office of Francophone Affairs, the Chambre économique de l'Ontario, Francophone immigration support networks (east, central-south-west and north), the Assemblée de la francophonie de l'Ontario, the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité de l'Ontario and the Union provinciale des minorités raciales et ethnoculturelles francophones. Two community members also attended. Presentations on Francophone immigration support networks

Questions-answers
Participants know about recent initiatives by members of the subcommittee; recent activities and strategic issues of the networks (reports and outlooks, trends, challenges and opportunities); and winning conditions for promoting the socio-economic integration of immigrants into the host society, especially in minority communities.
SWC participated in meetings on February 23 and April 13, 2011, for national and regional coordinators responsible for implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act in Quebec Anglophone communities.

SWC submitted a report on its completed initiatives that benefited Quebec Anglophone communities.

Presentation by Canadian Heritage's Interdepartmental Coordination team to the enlarged Management Committee.

The Ontario Regional Director, regional representative for the Quebec and Nunavut region, will participate in the June 16, 2011, meeting.

Greater access to relevant information by SWC staff to work more effectively with OLMW's communities.
Discussion and exchange workshops

Report to form part of the working document for the June 16 meeting

Presentation

Working document

Provide copy of PCH Coordinators' Guide - Official Languages Development of Communities and Linguistic Duality to all regional coordinators.
Coordinators are better informed about the particular context with regard to implementation of section 41 of the OLA in Quebec, as well as the reality of minority Anglophone and allophone groups; communication is improved between national and regional federal officials; federal representatives will be encouraged to participate in the meeting on June 16.

SWC will be better prepared to participate in the June 16, 2011, meeting, to be attended by all Quebec Anglophone and allophone communities. The meeting will discuss federal government initiatives affecting Quebec Anglophone communities.

The management team will be better informed about policies, programs and initiatives involved in implementation of section 41 of the OLA.

Makes known the support received by Quebec Anglophone community organizations from the Women's Community Fund and the Women's Partnership Fund. For example, SWC financial assistance helped the Quebec Community Groups Network to increase rural girls' social and economic participation.

Evidence of SWC strategic intervention regarding Section 41, OLA at government consultations and/or meetings at local, regional and national levels.
Representation and participation of the Atlantic regional director as the person responsible for Part VII.

Discussion with federal partners through quarterly meetings held in the language of choice at the Federal Council of the 4 Atlantic provinces:.

Participation in the committee on Francophone immigration in NB.

Participation in meetings and teleconferences of subcommittees of the four federal Atlantic Councils responsible for official languages.

An SWC Atlantic Regional Office employee was a member of the organizing committee for Official Languages Week in NB.

The Atlantic Regional Director is a member of the NB community-government discussion and cooperation table.
Members of interdepartmental committees sharing information and best practices

Meetings

Ongoing discussions

Consultations with counterparts on Parts IV, V, VII

Four meetings (in-person and teleconferences), agendas and minutes

List of federal-provincial participants

Regular quarterly meetings in French

Bilingual products and information tools

Sharing information and practices

Networking, learning

Sharing of best practices

Cooperation

Three meetings were held
Sharing of information and best practices.

Better understanding of issues and challenges; easier access to information and networking.

Participants are made aware of the particular needs of official language minority women.

Importance and advantages of considering official language minority women in files on Francophone immigration in NB.

Better dissemination of information, best practices and positive measures.

Greater participation by SWC staff in activities connected with Official Languages Week in NB.

Information sharing between colleagues.

Better understanding of issues of Francophone groups, such as French literacy; consideration of their multiple, growing needs in the fufillment of our mandate at SWC.
E. Funding and Program Delivery

Implementation of the institution's programs and delivery of its services; funding, alone or in cooperation with other federal institutions, of OLMC projects; inclusion of the needs of OLMCs in the delivery of the institution's programs and services.

Expected Result:
OLMCs are part of federal institution's regular clientele and have adequate access to its programs and services; OLMC needs (e.g., geographic dispersion, development opportunities) are taken into account.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs: Indicators to measure the expected result
Providing technical support (expertise) and funding to OLMC projects. Appropriate information

Availability of tools

Forms developed and used

Funding provided

Follow-ups and meetings for development

Projects representing provincial and local outcomes.

Development work with Francophone groups and funding applications received from them in the four Atlantic provinces

Partnership work

Meetings and conferences
In the Quebec and Nunavut Regional Office, three requests were submitted in the minority official language:
  • YWCA Montréal
  • YWCA Agvvik Nunavut
  • Radio CKUT
Approval of two out of the three Anglophone projects for which requests were submitted. The two projects are Blueprint Projects (YWCA Agvvik and Radio CKUT). The third request is still being processed.

Continuation of projects now under way that have an impact on Quebec Anglophone communities, e.g. Femmes en mouvement.

Completion of projects submitted by Saturviit Inuit Women's Association of Nunavik, the Shield of Athena and the Jamaican Canadian Community Women's League of Montréal Inc.
F. Accountability

Activities through which the federal institution integrates its work on the implementation of section 41 of the OLA with the institution's planning and accountability mechanisms (e.g., report on plans and priorities, departmental performance report, departmental business plan, status report on implementation of section 41 of the OLA, etc.); internal audits and evaluations of programs and services; regular review of programs and services as well as policies by senior managers of the institution to ensure implementation of section 41 of the OLA.

Expected Result:
Full integration of the OLMC perspective and OLA section 41 into federal institution's policies, programs and services; the reporting structure, internal evaluations, policy reviews determine how to better integrate OLMC's perspective.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs: Indicators to measure the expected result
Distribution and yearly updates of SWC's Annual Status Report and its Multiyear Action Plan on the implementation of section of the OLA. Status report and multi-year action plan concerning the implementation of section 41 of the OLA at SWC Update on activities performed and identification of potential actions to be taken.

Appendix 3
Initiatives Undertaken by Official Language Minority Women's Organizations.

National
Girls Action Foundation (GAF)
$407,262

Young Women: Learning and Leading for Change

This three-year project empowers young women and girls to take on leadership roles in their communities. By project's end 1,000 young women will have participated in activities aimed at developing their leadership competencies and increasing their knowledge on 1) violence prevention, 2) economic security and prosperity, and 3) leadership and democratic participation. These same young women will then participate in an innovative local project aimed at improving the situation of girls and women in their communities, led by 50 of their fellow project participants. 30 communities in British Columbia, Yukon, Quebec, Northwest Territories and Ontario will have improved the situation for girls and women as a result of innovative local projects. In addition, 40 adult women from community organizations will have gained skills and tools to enable them to facilitate local leadership programs for young marginalized girls in their communities.

Outreach and selection for participation in the training programs is based in part to favour official language minority community. 20% of the young women who participated in the young women's leadership training program and mentoring events were from official language minority communities - specifically 3 francophone young women (from Ontario and NB), and 1 English-speaking young woman from Quebec. 30% of the groups participating in the train-the-trainer for community organizations were from official language minority communities - 4 English community organizations from Quebec participate, as well as 3 French speaking organizations from the Yukon, NB, and Ontario.

National Initiative for the Care of the Elderly (NICE)
$390,227

Older Women and Financial Literacy: Bridging the Income Gap

This two year national project aims to foster the economic security of 468 women aged 55 and over by enhancing their financial literacy. Senior women will develop and deliver 12 two-day pilot workshops in four community agencies in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal. The proposed project: (1) specifically targets older women who are the most economically insecure, particularly unattached and immigrant women; (2) adopts a peer education model with a 'train the trainer' component, and (3) provides a comprehensive financial literacy information kit to: (a) create a personalized financial plan; (b) optimize pensions and public benefits; (c) adopt effective banking practices; (d) understand the legal dimensions of financial literacy, and (e) prevent or intervene in situations of financial abuse.

All project tools will be available in both French and English. A specific effort to include Anglophone women in Montreal is being made. The project regional coordinator in Montreal is bilingual and peer educators will be comprised of both French and English speakers. Half of the workshops in Montreal will be offered in English and the other half will be offered in French.

Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM)
$361,265

National Women in Municipal Government Program

This project will strengthen the ability of 315 women to run for elected positions in 20 Canadian municipalities across the country, particularly in rural and remote areas. The Federation will run a recruitment campaign with the support of current female municipal politicians to identify women, particularly minority women, with leadership potential in their communities. Recruited participants will receive training on running for municipal office. The project also includes a "protégée" program whereby female politicians mentor 65 participants. In addition, it will engage municipal councils and encourage them to actively recruit women and to implement a "women in municipal government strategy."

All project tools and resources, including the project website, webinars and press materials, are available in both French and English. To date the organization has had a small number of Francophone women attend its workshops offered in Winnipeg and Prince Edward Island. FCM is planning French workshops targeted at Francophone women in New Brunswick this fall. As the project progresses more OLMW are expected to be reached.

West
Les EssentiElles, Yukon
$42,406

Renforcement PluriElles [Strengthening a Diversity of Women]

Les EssentiElles is proposing a 12-month French-language project with bilingual portions to prevent violence against women and girls. The project comprises three components: healthy relationships, women and society, and women and leadership. The project will include the development of a training manual on healthy relationships for young people, and on self-defence techniques. Trainers will be trained so they can then conduct these workshops in schools and in the community. In addition, a series of workshops will be offered to women and girls to strengthen their interpersonal, social and economic skills. The training will be supported by awareness-raising events that will bring together the community and provide it with tangible ways to address violence against women and girls.

Atlantic
New Brunswick Coalition for Pay Equity
$173,000

Blueprint Project. Increasing women's involvement as decision-makers in community-based organizations - This 24-month project will develop innovative mentorship models and supports to increase women's involvement as leaders and decision-makers in community-based organizations. A key component will be to prepare women already in leadership positions in community-based organizations to serve as mentors to those with little or no experience of civic engagement, and wherever possible, to involve them as leaders in their own community-based organizations. Results will be shared with other organizations and target populations across Canada.

Kent Centre for the Prevention of Family Violence
$103,132

Blueprint Project: Improving access to second-stage services for women who have experienced abuse - This 24-month project will respond to the specific needs of women, including Aboriginal and immigrant women, who have experienced abuse as they transition to violence-free lives. Innovative service delivery models and supports will be tested over the course of the project to ensure women using shelters benefit from new approaches and standards. The project will facilitate improvements in services for abused women and results will be shared with organizations working on similar issues across Canada.

Collectivité ingénieuse de la Péninsule acadienne (CIPA) Inc.
195,644

Blueprint Project: Engaging youth in preventing violence against women and girls - This 24-month project will develop/adapt approaches to engaging youth in violence prevention. Youth will identify the issues of violence affecting girls and young women in their communities, expand their knowledge of these issues, develop leadership skills, and deliver innovative youth-led projects to address the issues within their communities.

Restigouche CBDC Inc.
$300,000

Blueprint Project. Improving financial and growth opportunities for women business owners - This 24-month project will develop/adapt innovative programs and other supports to increase growth opportunities for women owners of small and medium-sized businesses, including immigrant and Aboriginal women. A gender-based analysis of programming and planning will assist participants in their efforts to ensure that business development programs and other supports respond to the specific needs of women entrepreneurs, including those from immigrant and Aboriginal communities. This project will explore practical ways to address and overcome these and other barriers to success for women business owners.

Services à la famille Nepisiguit Family Services Inc.
$136,500

Blueprint Project. Improving access to second-stage services for women who have experienced abuse - This 24-month project will respond to the specific needs of women, including Aboriginal and immigrant women, who have experienced abuse as they transition to violence-free lives. Innovative service delivery models and supports will be tested over the course of the project to ensure women using shelters benefit from new approaches and standards. The project will facilitate improvements in services for abused women and results will be shared with organizations working on similar issues across Canada.

Ontario
Carrefour des femmes du Sud Ouest de l'Ontario
$310,252

Étincelle [Spark]

Over a 36-month period, this regional project will provide entrepreneurship training to 90 Canadian, immigrant and refugee women who are Francophones and live in London, Sarnia, Windsor or Chatham. The aim is to improve their socio-economic conditions as well as their employability. The eight first weeks of the project will focus on updating and introduction of existing resources, including those produced by the Union culturelle des Franco-Ontariennes. Next, a series of eight workshops a year will deal with specific themes related to the different stages of establishing and managing a small business. The participants will visit some Ontario businesses started and headed by women, with the aim of making the link between practice and the theory taught in the workshops. While not to be compared to a university program, this targeted training will help participants acquire the knowledge and skills needed to understand the reality of the business world and women's entrepreneurship in Canada, and to crystallize their business plans.

Table féministe francophone de concertation provinciale de l'Ontario
$300,000

Femmes francophones et participation citoyenne au sein de la gouvernance municipal [Francophone women and civic participation in municipal government]

This project will enable 100 Francophone minority women to acquire the skills needed to be leaders and hold decision-making positions on advisory boards and municipal councils. Participants will receive training on municipal government and its institutions; leadership and influence; and equality policies and inclusion measures. Participants will also have at least one group mentoring session and will receive the support of leaders involved with the project. The latter will also work to establish agreements with at least three municipalities to enhance their practices/measures to foster the participation of Francophone women in their decision-making bodies. One hundred other women will be recruited and registered in a provincial candidates' bank that can be consulted for positions in various decision-making bodies. All of the training will be included in a best practices guide to be disseminated at the end of the 36-month project.

Quebec and Nunavut
Women in Cities International
$199,070

Blueprint Project. Engaging youth in preventing violence against women and girls - This 24-month project will develop/adapt approaches to engaging youth in violence prevention. Youth will identify the issues of violence affecting girls and young women in their communities, expand their knowledge of these issues, develop leadership skills, and deliver innovative youth-led projects to address the issues within their communities.