Minister's Message

Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch, Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women

I am pleased to present Status of Women Canada’s 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities.

The Government of Canada is determined to build a society where women and men are equal participants in all aspects of life. To this end, Status of Women Canada continues to play a vital role in advancing our priorities in key areas.

In 2015-16, our Government will continue to take action to end gender-based violence. This includes the implementation of the Action Plan to Address Family Violence and Violent Crimes Against Aboriginal Women and Girls. The Action Plan takes immediate and concrete action to prevent violence, support victims, and protect Aboriginal women and girls through new and ongoing commitments totalling close to $200 million over five years.

Delivering on a commitment made in Economic Action Plan 2014, through much of the past year, we consulted Canadians on how best to increase the number of women entering into and succeeding in business. To inform the Government’s work in this area, an Expert Panel on Championing and Mentorship for Women Entrepreneurs and an Advisory Council on Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders were established. Status of Women Canada will continue its work in the year ahead to promote economic opportunities for women and support women entrepreneurs. These actions align with our Government’s number one priority of creating jobs, growth and long-term prosperity for all Canadians.

The important work of the Women’s Program at Status of Women Canada will continue in 2015-16. A number of projects will be launched as part of a recent Call for Proposals entitled Economic Prosperity: Positioning Women for Success. Projects under this Call address institutional barriers that limit economic opportunities for women.

Girls are tomorrow’s women and we must work to empower them. Building on the momentum generated by the "Strong Girls, Strong World" event organized by Status of Women Canada in Toronto in October, 2014, a new Girls Advisory Council will be established early in 2015 to contribute to this work, and to keep finding new ways to empower girls.



The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch, P.C., O.Ont.M.P.
Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch

Head of Agency: Meena Ballantyne

Ministerial Portfolio: Employment and Social Development Canada

Enabling Instrument: Order in Council (1976-779)

Year of Incorporation: 1976

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

The Office of the Coordinator, Status of Women, known as Status of Women Canada (SWC), is a federal government agency that promotes equality between women and men in all aspects of Canadian life. The mandate of SWC is “to coordinate policy with respect to the status of women and administer related programs” (1976).

SWC is responsible for exercising leadership and working in partnership to promote and advance equality by: supporting community-based action and innovation that will lead to equality by helping to create conditions for success for women and girls in Canada; providing expert advice on gender equality and Gender-based Analysis in the development of effective programs, policies and legislation for all Canadians; promoting commemorative dates relating to women and girls in Canada; and supporting Canada’s efforts to meet international obligations.

SWC works to promote and advance equality for women and girls, focusing its efforts in three areas: improving women’s and girls’ economic security and prosperity; ending violence against women and girls; and supporting the advancement and increased representation of women and girls in leadership and decision-making roles.

While SWC focuses on these three areas, the agency is able to address specific issues such as engaging men and boys in ending violence, increasing women’s participation in skilled trades and technical professions or assisting women in rural and remote communities.

Responsibilities

SWC is the primary federal agency responsible for supporting the Government’s commitment to advancing equality for women and girls. In fulfilling its mandate, the agency works with a wide range of organizations, building synergies with key stakeholders, collaborating with different levels of government and engaging the private and voluntary sectors.

SWC functions in a complex environment where issues affecting women and girls are constantly evolving as a result of demographic changes, technology, globalization and socio-economic factors. To bring about concrete results and enduring benefits for Canadians, the agency carries out its mandate strategically, working in partnerships, and ensuring its policy interventions and program investments are aligned with Government priorities.

In its policy function, SWC works as a knowledge broker and facilitator, offering advice and support, conducting analysis, providing input and making targeted interventions at both domestic and international levels on women’s issues.

SWC leads in building capacity across government in the integration of Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) as a core competency to ensure that diverse groups of women and men are considered in the development of policies, programs and legislation.

Through the Women’s Program, SWC provides financial and professional assistance to organizations that carry out projects that promote equality between women and men. SWC supports community-based action and innovation by investing resources where there is a clear potential for making a sustained difference in the lives of women and girls in Canada.

To raise awareness, SWC marks commemorative dates such as: International Women’s Day (March 8), Women’s History Month (October), the International Day of the Girl (October 11), Persons Day (October 18), the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women (December 6) and 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence.

SWC’s three regional offices are located in Montréal (serving Quebec), Moncton (serving New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador), and Edmonton (serving Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, Northwest Territories and Yukon). The National Office, also serving Nunavut, and the Ontario regional office, are located within the headquarters in the National Capital Region.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

1. Strategic Outcome: Equality between women and men is promoted and advanced in Canada

1.1 Program: Leadership, Expertise and Advice

1.2 Program: Advancing Equality for Women

Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Programs
Addressing violence against women and girls Ongoing
  • Program 1.1
  • Program 1.2
Description

Why is this priority?

  • The Government is committed to addressing violence against women and girls, which continues at high rates (80% of intimate partner violence victims are women) with severe impacts on individuals, families and society. At $7.4 billion a year, spousal violence is a significant cost to Canada’s economy. In 2014, the Government renewed its commitment to reduce violence against Aboriginal women and girls through its Economic Action Plan commitment of $25 million over five years and the release of the Action Plan to Address Family Violence and Violent Crimes Against Aboriginal Women and Girls.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Provide funding and professional assistance to organizations to support projects that target specific issues such as the causes of violence against women and girls;
  • Collaborate with key partners to build knowledge about the nature, extent and impact of gender-based violence, with a particular focus on sexual violence as well as on family violence and violent crimes against Aboriginal women and girls;
  • Work in collaboration with federal organizations, provinces and territories and civil society to address persistent and emerging issues, influence decisions/actions of key players, and seek innovative strategies to prevent and end violence against women and girls.
Priority Type Programs
Increasing representation of women in leadership and decision-making roles Ongoing
  • Program 1.1
  • Program 1.2
Description

Why is this priority?

  • In Canada, nearly 40% of FP500 companies and close to half of publicly traded companies have no women on their boards. In Economic Action Plan 2012, the Government took steps to address this issue by creating the Advisory Council on Women on Boards. In 2014, the Advisory Council report recommended ways to move Canadian public and private organizations toward improved gender-balance in leadership and decision-making roles, and set a national objective of 30% representation of women on boards by 2019.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Provide funding and professional assistance to organizations to support projects that encourage the representation of women and girls in leadership and decision-making roles;
  • Engage key stakeholders in public and private sectors to support the implementation of the Advisory Council’s recommendation to achieve the 30% national objective;
  • Advance understanding, improve communication and facilitate exchange of knowledge among partners (e.g. provinces, territories) to increase women’s representation in leadership and decision- making roles.
Priority Type Programs
Strengthening implementation of Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) Ongoing
  • Program 1.1
Description

Why is this priority?

  • The Government remains committed to ensuring that policies, programs and legislation are inclusive of and responsive to the realities of diverse groups of women, men, girls and boys in Canada. SWC has a leadership role in building the capacity of federal organizations to integrate gender and diversity considerations into their decision-making processes.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Support federal organizations to build internal GBA+ capacity, through the provision of training, advice, access to tools and networks, and support under the Departmental Action Plan on Gender-based Analysis;
  • Expand GBA+ partnerships in new federal organizations and sectors.
Priority Type Programs
Promoting economic opportunities for women Ongoing
  • Program 1.1
  • Program 1.2
Description

Why is this priority?

  • Women play a vital role in the current priorities of job creation, economic growth and long-term prosperity. Yet, the gender mix in skilled trades and technical professions continues to be highly unbalanced. Men account for 93% of all trades workers in Canada. Women represent just 22% of the sciences and technology workforce in Canada. As such, there is a need to address women’s under-representation in growth sectors of the economy by promoting the recruitment and retention of women in skilled trades and technical professions as well as supporting women to enter into and succeed in business.
  • In an effort to address this issue, the Government took concrete steps, through Economic Action Plan 2014 by creating the Expert Panel on Championing and Mentorship for Women Entrepreneurs, the Advisory Council on Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders and the Group of Leaders on Women and the Economy, which continue to engage with players in key economic sectors.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Provide funding and professional assistance to organizations to support projects that work to increase and/or strengthen women’s economic prosperity and security;
  • Advance understanding, examine strategies and promote best practices to address barriers and improve awareness of the benefits of increasing the participation of women in skilled trades, technical professions and entrepreneurship;
  • Continue to foster a supportive environment for women entrepreneurs and enhance stakeholder engagement in skilled trades, technical professions and entrepreneurship.
Priority Type Programs
Modernizing programs and services for Canadians Ongoing
  • Program 1.2
Description

Why is this priority?

  • Through continuous innovation and transformation, SWC seeks to ensure efficiency, accountability and effective allocation of resources to achieve results.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Continue to enhance the Women’s Program management and accountability to achieve better results and greater impact.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks

SWC monitors its strategic and operating environment in order to manage effectively risks with potential impact on the implementation of its activities and progress toward its strategic outcome. The agency’s Corporate Risk Profile identifies potential risks and mitigation strategies, as highlighted below:

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
SWC’s outcomes are interdependent on the actions of other stakeholders. SWC Messaging: SWC’s communication strategy seeks to raise awareness of the opportunities and barriers facing women and of the shared responsibility to advance gender equality.

Community Action and Engagement: SWC’s programming is focused on engaging communities to achieve concrete results that help advance gender equality in a sustained manner.

Knowledge Sharing: SWC focuses on strategies that complement and leverage collaborative efforts and ensures that best practices are shared across the country.
Equality between women and men is promoted and advanced in Canada
Given its broad mandate and the demand for its program and policy interventions, SWC may be perceived as not meeting/responding to stakeholder expectations. Area of Focus: To respond to stakeholder expectations and to bring about meaningful results, SWC has identified three areas of focus that are aligned with Government priorities: improving women’s economic security and prosperity, ending violence against women and girls, and supporting the advancement and increased representation of women in leadership and decision-making roles.

Outreach Strategy: SWC’s outreach efforts with communities and organizations are designed to communicate the agency’s strategic direction, areas of focus, current priorities and program guidelines.

Decision-Making Processes: SWC has instituted processes and practices that maximize the efficiency of its programming, policy and communication levers.

Strategic Investment/Intervention: To remain relevant, effective and efficient, SWC leverages partnerships and builds synergies with other organizations in developing and delivering its interventions.
Equality between women and men is promoted and advanced in Canada

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
29,543,077 29,543,077 29,532,997 29,532,997
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
96 96 96
Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2012–13
ExpendituresTable Note *
2013–14
Expenditures
2014–15
Forecast Spending
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
Total N/a 31,422,283 31,314,000 29,543,077 29,543,077 29,532,997 29,532,997
Strategic Outcome 1: Equality between women and men is promoted and advanced in Canada
1.1. Leadership, Expertise and Advice N/a 2,189,159 2,505,000 2,142,013 2,142,013 2,140,228 2,140,228
1.2. Advancing Equality for Women N/a 22,750,191 24,348,000 23,155,089 23,155,089 23,151,309 23,151,309
Subtotal N/a 24,939,350 26,853,000 25,296,102 25,296,102 25,291,537 25,291,537
Internal Services
Subtotal
N/a 6,482,533 4,461,000 4,245,975 4,245,975 4,241,460 4,241,460

Table Notes

Table Note *

Due to changes in SWC’s Program Alignment Architecture for 2013-14 and future years, the breakdown of actual spending by Program for 2012-13 is not applicable for this table.

Return to table note * referrer

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015-16 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government FrameworkEndnote i (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2015-16 Planned Spending
Equality between women and men is promoted and advanced in Canada Leadership, Expertise and Advice Government Affairs A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government 2,142,013
  Advancing Equality for Women Economic Affairs Income security and employment for Canadians 23,155,089
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic affairs 23,155,089
Government affairs 2,142,013

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend (Thousands of dollars)
  2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 1,262 1,325 1,204 1,229 1,229 1,229
Voted 28,466 30,097 28,404 28,314 28,304 28,304
  2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 1,262 1,325 1,204 1,229 1,229 1,229
Voted 28,466 30,097 28,404 28,314 28,304 28,304

Estimates by Vote

For information on SWC’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2015–16 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat websiteEndnote ii.

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