Tools for Educators/Coaches

As kids grow, their relationship circle grows too. It's never too early to start teaching kids about healthy relationships—between men and women, boys and girls, parents, relatives, friends, peers, teachers.

As an educator or coach, you have enormous capacity to positively influence young people. You can help them develop the skills and attitudes that promote non-violent behaviour and positive interactions with others.

Tips for broaching a difficult subject

Before raising the issue of violence against women and girls in the classroom, you may wish to discuss your lesson plan with school administrators.

It’s important to remember that discussions of violence against women and girls can be emotionally charged and personal in nature. Some victims may have been sexually or physically abused at home, while others may have experienced violence in dating relationships, or have been bullied at school.

Most provincial and territorial ministries of education offer guidance and materials for teaching youth about healthy relationships. There are also many educational packages available from relevant community organizations.

If you suspect abuse...

Of course, one of the most difficult challenges for professionals who work with children and youth is to identify abuse and know when and how to report suspected cases.

Every province and territory has a law that says that any person who believes a child is being abused must report it. You will not get in trouble for making the report if you have reason to believe a child is being abused, even if it turns out you were wrong.

If you have reason to believe a child is being abused, call 911 or the police or child welfare services in your area.

A Selection of Educational Aids and Resources

White Ribbon Campaign in a Box

Fully interactive exercises designed to help teach and promote healthy, equal relationships among boys and girls. Meets Ontario curriculum expectations and is specifically formulated for use in grades 5 to 8. To order: visit White Ribbon Campaign or 1-800-328-2228.

Canadian Red Cross RespectED Educational Program

RespectED promotes healthier relationships and safer communities.

Respect Group Inc.

Respect Group Inc. offers a range of online education programs, including Respect in Sport for Coaches and Activity Leaders and Respect in School.

RePlay Video Games

Online games for youth aged 8 to 14 promotes healthy relationships and shows how to challenge violent or abusive behaviours and attitudes. Resource booklets for youth, educators and parents accompany the video games. More details at METRAC.

HeForShe (UN Women)

Promotes gender equality as a human rights issue and engages men in the movement.

Kids in the Know Cyberbullying Resources (Canadian Centre for Child Protection)

Provides education modules addressing sexual exploitation, technology and bullying for children in grades 7-8 and 9-10.

Stop Hating Online (Public Safety Canada)

Provides information and advice on cyberbullying for both teens and parents.

Of course, one of the most difficult challenges for professionals who work with children and youth is to identify abuse and know when and how to report suspected cases.

Every province and territory has a law that says that any person who believes a child is being abused must report it. You will not get in trouble for making the report if you have reason to believe a child is being abused, even if it turns out you were wrong.

If you have reason to believe a child is being abused, call 911 or the police or child welfare services in your area.

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