2013-14 Departmental Performance Report

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Equality between Women and Men is Promoted and Advanced in Canada

Program 1.1: Leadership, Expertise and Advice

Description

Canada, in line with domestic and international instruments, has committed to advancing gender equality. SWC promotes public understanding about the status of women in Canada and encourages Canadians to engage in efforts to advance equality between women and men. Communications activities form a key aspect of this Program and commemorate important dates such as the International Day of the Girl, Women’s History Month and the Persons Day.

To further advance gender equality, the government requires federal organizations to take gender considerations into account in legislation, policies and programs. By providing information, tools, training and expert advice, SWC plays a lead role in building the capacity of federal organizations to use Gender-based Analysis (GBA). GBA is an analytical process used to assess the potential impacts of policies, programs or initiatives on diverse groups of women and men, girls and boys. GBA informs decision-making and increases the likelihood that legislation, policies and programs meet the needs of diverse groups of women and men.

SWC also provides strategic policy analysis and advice on numerous issues, aligned with the three priority areas (e.g. improving women’s and girls’ economic security and prosperity, ending violence against women and girls; and supporting the advancement and increased representation of women and girls in leadership and decision-making roles). SWC acts as a knowledge broker to support federal organizations and other stakeholders in advancing equality for women and girls. In addition, SWC explores gaps and emerging issues that continue to affect the status of women and girls in Canada. This work is mainly done in collaboration with other federal organizations, provinces, territories and civil society.

This table shows, for 2013-14, the main estimates, planned spending, total authorities available for use, actual spending (authorities used) and the difference (actual minus planned), for Program 1.1, “Leadership, Expertise and Advice”.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013–14
Main Estimates
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013–14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013–14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,135,462 2,135,462 2,177,213 2,189,159 53,697

This table shows the number of planned (17) and actual (17) FTEs for 2013-14, as well as the difference (actual minus planned) between the two (0) for Program 1.1, “Leadership, Expertise and Advice”.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2013–14
Planned
2013–14
Actual
2013–14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
17 17 0

This table highlights the expected results, performance indicators, targets and Actual Results for Program 1.1, “Leadership, Expertise and Advice”.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Through SWC leadership, key stakeholders have access to advice and information to address issues relating to equality between women and men and boys and girls. (Key stakeholders include federal organizations, provinces, territories, civil society and the general public). Number of SWC-led interventions that provide advice and information 5 SWC-led initiatives 5 SWC-led interventions provided stakeholders with access to advice and information to address issues relating to gender equality.
Through the provision of SWC expertise, federal government officials and key stakeholders have increased knowledge of Gender-based Analysis (GBA). (Key stakeholders include representatives from provinces, territories, civil society and the general public.) Percentage of respondents that indicate their knowledge of GBA has increased following GBA training/events. 70% 90% of respondents indicated increased knowledge and ability to apply GBA to their work, following SWC training/events.
Canadian media reports on contribution made by SWC towards advancing equality for women and girls. Percentage of SWC-led initiatives that result in media reports 20% 59% of SWC-led initiatives resulted in media reports

Text Description of Table

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Through SWC’s leadership, expertise and advice, key stakeholders had access to information, support and tools to address issues related to equality between women and men, boys and girls. Key SWC-led interventions in 2013-14 were:

Cyberbullying and Online Sexual Exploitation Knowledge Event
  • SWC worked with provinces and territories on a workshop on cyberbullying and online sexual exploitation in the lives of girls and young women, with presentations from experts, a youth panel and government officials from across the country. The workshop enhanced understanding and knowledge of the issue and facilitated the sharing of information on promising responses. Reports can be found at: (http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/initiatives/girls-filles/cyber-eng.html). SWC also supported the Students Commission to produce a report on youth perspectives on self/peer exploitation and cyberbullying (http://www.studentscommission.ca/onlineexploitation/).
Leading Canada’s involvement in the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW);
  • To celebrate the International Day of the Girl at the United Nations, Canada, represented by the Minister of Status of Women, co-hosted with the United Nations Working Group on Girls, an innovative panel entitled “Girls Speak Out”. Addressing top United Nations officials, girl leaders from around the world spoke on issues affecting girls, both locally and globally, including: child, early and forced marriage, access to education and job training, immigration and health. This panel which had an audience of more than 500 girls was featured prominently on UN TV. (http://webtv.un.org/search/girls-speak-out-showcasing-girl-activists-from-around-the-world/2743264257001?term=girls%20speak%20out).
Building Canada’s Innovation Economy Knowledge Event;
  • SWC hosted a Knowledge Event, providing a forum for leading experts who shared knowledge, best practices and insight into ways to address challenges, create opportunities and enhance the participation of women in a range of skilled trades and technical and science professions. Organized in collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, this event was attended by over 250 people, representing different sectors.
Partnership with Federal/Provincial-Territorial Ministers for Status of Women;
  • SWC continued to work with the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Forum of Ministers Responsible for the Status of Women, participating in the release of the Conference Board of Canada study, The Business Case for Women on Boards, a valuable resource that outlines the benefits of having more women on boards. Through SWC’s activities and the work of the Advisory Council on Women on Boards, there is enhanced awareness in public and private sectors of ways to increase women’s representation on boards. This knowledge will be used to inform Government and private sector actions in this area.
Strengthening implementation of GBA
  • Through the Departmental Action Plan on GBA and other outreach, SWC provided training, advice and support to over 30 federal organizations to build their capacity to incorporate gender considerations into programs, policies and other initiatives. Departments report annually to SWC on implementation of the Action Plan on GBA, detailing activities undertaken and demonstrating the impact of GBA on initiatives.
  • The Introduction to GBA+ online course, available on the SWC website, was completed by over 500 people during the reporting period. While the majority were federal officials, provincial and territorial partners and members of the general public also took advantage of this tool. The course was recognized by the National Collaborating Centres on the Determinants of Health as one of the top 12 online courses on social determinants of health and health equity. In the evaluations from the online course and these events, over 90% of participants indicated an increased knowledge of GBA, following SWC learning events, exceeding SWC’s target of 70%.

In May 2013, the second annual GBA Awareness Week enhanced the visibility of GBA across government. Fourteen different departments and agencies undertook awareness-raising activities. SWC also co-hosted two government-wide GBA learning events, in collaboration with Public Safety Canada and Natural Resources Canada respectively, attended by over 200 federal officials.

Program 1.2: Advancing Equality for Women

Description

Through this Program, SWC supports action and innovation by investing in initiatives that work to bring about equality between women and men. The Program provides grant and contribution funding to organizations to support community-based action that will lead to equality in communities across Canada. Funded projects occur at the national, regional and local levels and work to help create conditions for success for women in Canada.

Projects address the economic and social situation of women and their participation in democratic life. They are diverse in nature and scope and apply a variety of approaches and strategies to address the complexity of the issues affecting women. Specifically, the Program invests in projects that incorporate gender considerations, and increase and strengthen access to a range of opportunities, supports, information, resources and services, tools, etc. Projects work with stakeholders such as: women’s and community organizations, public institutions and the private sector.

The Program also facilitates collaboration, networking and partnerships to promote equality and the advancement of women in Canada. SWC facilitates networking; develops partnerships where needed to address horizontal issues impacting women and girls; shares knowledge; and assists organizations working to advance women’s equality to gain access to expertise, resources and tools.

This table shows, for 2013-14, the main estimates, planned spending, total authorities available for use, actual spending (authorities used) and the difference (actual minus planned), for Program 1.2, “Advancing Equality for Women”.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013–14
Main Estimates
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013–14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013–14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
24,286,364 24,286,364 24,369,664 22,750,591 (1,535,773)

This table shows the number of planned (34) and actual (34) FTEs for 2013-14, as well as the difference (actual minus planned) between the two (0) for Program 1.2, “Advancing Equality for Women”.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2013–14
Planned
2013–14
Actual
2013–14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
34 34 0

This table highlights the expected results, performance indicators, targets and actual results for Program 1.2, “Advancing Equality for Women”.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Women and communities have access to supports to address issues relating to equality between women and men Percentage of projects that generate supports (e.g. resources, tools). 50%  
Communities and stakeholders have access to opportunities to advance equality between women and men Percentage of projects that facilitate opportunities (e.g., partnerships, networks, strategies) 50% 90% of projects contributed to increased access to supports to address issues relating to equality between women and men

Text Description of Table

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, SWC worked to help create conditions for success for women in Canada by investing strategically, facilitating networks, and supporting partnerships. The agency provided $18,950,000 to support 357 projects to address barriers (e.g. violence against women and girls that stops them from reaching their full potential; gender-based stereotyping; and factors that prevent women from attaining key decision-making positions).

Addressing violence against women and girls: SWC launched a call for proposals to address gender-based violence against women and girls under two themes: cyberviolence and sexual violence against women and girls.

Women’s economic security and prosperity: A call for proposals was launched to increase and strengthen economic opportunities for women in Canada under three themes: women in skilled professional trades and technical professions, economic options for women, and prosperity for immigrant women.

Increasing representation of women in leadership roles: Targeted calls create opportunities to invest strategically, for example, increasing women’s involvement as decision-makers in community-based organizations (CBOs) and advancing women in non-traditional occupations. Promising practices for women and stakeholders are being identified and shared. Tools were developed to promote increased gender and diversity within CBOs, and mentorship models for women leaders in different settings such as rural communities.

Projects have impacts on women, communities, and organizations. There is evidence that investments are making a real difference in the lives of women and girls in Canada. Concrete results include:

  • To ensure sustainability, a network was established in the Peterborough area and will continue to improve services for abused women by coordinating services in the region;
  • To address the needs of women entrepreneurs, a toolkit was developed for credit unions and other lenders in Vancouver on how to effectively support women entrepreneurs who wish to grow their business;
  • To increase the number of women in municipal politics, municipal councils across Canada were engaged and encouraged to actively recruit women and to implement a “women in municipal government strategy”.

SWC continued to facilitate networking among organizations; worked in partnership with federal partners to address horizontal issues impacting women and girls; shared knowledge; and assisted organizations to access expertise, and resources. Promising practices and lessons learned are gathered and shared with relevant stakeholders to avoid duplication.

Modernizing programs and services for Canadians: SWC improved the management and strengthened accountability of the Program through streamlining its administration with more efficient and structured management strategies.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

This table shows, for 2013-14, the main estimates, planned spending, total authorities available for use, actual spending (authorities used) and the difference (actual minus planned), for Internal Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013–14
Main Estimates
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013–14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013–14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,195,341 3,195,341 5,440,044 6,482,533 3,287,192

This table shows the number of planned (45) and actual (45) FTEs for 2013-14, as well as the difference (actual minus planned) between the two (0) for Internal Services.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2013–14
Planned
2013–14
Actual
2013–14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
45 45 0

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, SWC continued to implement information management initiatives to safeguard the agency’s information and to maximize its value in the service of Canadians.

  • With the move of its headquarters to a new location, SWC was able to decrease its space by approximately 21%, therefore reducing the government’s overall office footprint and its accommodation/lease costs. As a result, Public Works and Government Services Canada transferred $208,350 to SWC through the Supplementary Estimates (C) exercise. This amount will be added to SWC’s base budget for future years.
  • SWC received $1.6M through the Supplementary Estimates (B) exercise to fund the majority of costs associated with the relocation. The funding is a multi-year loan that SWC will be repaying over the next eight years at $200,000 per year, commencing 2014-15. The reduction in space requirements and the resulting increase to SWC base budget will offset the cost of repaying the loan over the next eight years.