Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Equality between women and men is promoted and advanced in Canada

Program 1.1: Leadership, Expertise and Advice

Description

Canada, in line with domestic and international instruments, has committed to advancing gender equality. SWC promotes public understanding about the status of women in Canada and encourages Canadians to engage in efforts to advance equality between women and men. Communications’ activities form a key aspect of this Program and commemorate important dates such as Women’s History Month and the Persons Day.

To further advance gender equality, the government requires federal organizations to take gender considerations into account in legislation, policies and programs. By providing information, tools, training and expert advice, SWC plays a lead role in building the capacity of federal organizations to use gender-based analysis plus (GBA+). GBA+ informs decision-making and increases the likelihood that legislation, policies and programs meet the needs of diverse groups of women and men.

SWC also provides strategic policy analysis and advice and acts as a knowledge broker to support federal organizations and other stakeholders in advancing equality for women and girls. In addition, SWC explores gaps and emerging issues that continue to affect the status of women and girls in Canada.

This is mainly done in collaboration with other federal organizations, provinces, territories and civil society.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,136,900 2,136,900 2,286,900 2,004,692 (132,208)

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])

2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
17 17 0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Through SWC leadership, key stakeholders have access to advice and information to address issues relating to equality between women and men and boys and girls. (Key stakeholders include federal organizations, provinces, territories, civil society and the general public). Number of SWC-led interventions that provide advice and information. Interventions include activities that are often long-term and may require significant preparation, human and financial resources. (Activities may include: disseminating knowledge, facilitating dialogue, leading action on SWC priorities, and advice, collaboration and external relations to advance SWC and federal priorities. (For example, leading Canada’s participation at the UN Commission on the Status of Women requires 6-8 months of preparation). 5 Five SWC-led initiatives provided advice and information to key stakeholders to address issues relating to equality between women and men and boys and girls.
Through the provision of SWC expertise, federal government officials and key stakeholders have increased knowledge of gender-based analysis plus (GBA+). (Key stakeholders include representatives from provinces, territories, civil society and the general public). Percentage of respondents that indicate their knowledge of GBA+ has increased following GBA+ training/events. 75% 93% of respondents indicated their knowledge of GBA+ increased following GBA+ training/events.
Canadian media reports on contribution made by SWC towards advancing equality for women and girls. Percentage of SWC-led initiatives that result in media reports. 20% 50% of SWC-led initiatives resulted in media reports

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The performance analysis for this Program demonstrates that the target for this fiscal year has been met and SWC-led initiatives have achieved the planned results: access to advice, information and networking among key stakeholders so as to address issues relating to equality between women and men. The key SWC-led interventions in 2014-15 are highlighted below:

  • The Action Plan to Address Family Violence and Violent Crimes Against Aboriginal Women and Girls: SWC led the development of the Action Plan which serves to enhance collaboration, awareness and community capacity to prevent and address violence against Aboriginal women and girls.
  • The National Roundtable on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls: On behalf of the Government of Canada, the then Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women participated in the Roundtable where key stakeholders agreed on a Framework to Prevent and Address Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls Which includes prevention, community safety and police and justice responses as priority areas for collaborative action.
  • Promoting Women on Boards: SWC supported the work of the Advisory Council for Promoting Women on Boards as it released its report, Good for Business: A Plan to Promote the Participation of More Women on Canadian Boards. The report enhanced knowledge on best practices within corporate Canada to help advance women into leadership positions in the public and private sectors. The report has positioned gender diversity as a business imperative, inspiring a positive response and creating momentum in efforts to reach the goal of 30% women on boards by 2019.
  • Women Entrepreneurs Forum: Investing in the Future: Organized by SWC, in collaboration with federal partners, this event brought together more than 300 Canadian women entrepreneurs, business networks and key stakeholders. The Forum provided participants access to information and expert advice, networking and connections as well as mentorship opportunities. According to an evaluation of the Forum, the event achieved its objectives and met participant expectations in terms of advice, connections and practical information.
  • Leading Canada’s involvement in the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW): The Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women led Canada’s Delegation to the 59th Session of UNCSW. The Commission undertook a review of progress made in the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, twenty years after its adoption at the Fourth World Conference for Women in 1995. The Minister delivered Canada’s Statement and participated in a high-level roundtable, addressing women’s economic empowerment. (http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/med/sta-dec/2015/0310-eng.html) Alongside the Commission, Canada hosted three well-received side events on cyberviolence, child, early and forced marriage and girls’ empowerment. Over 600 people, including senior United Nations and government officials and representatives of Canadian and international civil society attended the event.

Strengthening Implementation of GBA+

SWC continued to support federal organizations through training, expert advice and other direct assistance in order to build capacity to incorporate gender considerations in programs, policies and other initiatives. There is evidence of a steady increase in GBA+ knowledge and capacity, as seen in the growing number of GBA+ trained professionals. Key GBA+ initiatives are highlighted below:

  • Departmental Action Plan on Gender-based Analysis (GBA): SWC supported over 30 federal organizations by providing them with training, expert advice and other direct supports.
  • GBA+ Online Training: SWC re-launched the revised Introduction to GBA+ Online Course with updated language, a more user-friendly interface and new case studies designed to make the course relevant to a wider range of sectors. During the reporting year, more than 1,000 people (67.5% from the federal public service and 32.5% from provincial/territorial and the private sector) took the course, a 50% increase from the previous year. According to the post-training survey, 92% of respondents reported being able to apply GBA+ to their work.
  • GBA+ Awareness and Learning Events: The 3rd annual GBA+ Awareness Week” (May 5-9, 2014) was launched by the Clerk of the Privy Council and the Head of SWC to promote GBA+ tools, learning, and awareness raising activities. A total of 19 federal organizations participated in GBA+ Awareness Week. SWC also hosted a one-day Boot Camp for gender focal points to increase understanding of GBA+ commitments, share strategies for sustainable GBA+ practice and build capacity.
  • GBA+ Champions Event: In February 2015, SWC hosted the first ever meeting of senior officials appointed as GBA+ Champions to promote leadership and networking.

Engaging with Canadians:

  • On October 22, 2014, SWC hosted the “Strong Girls, Strong World” event in Toronto, bringing together girls and influential Canadians to explore issues faced by girls in Canada and globally. The event included presentations from a number of high-profile speakers, including Hannah Godefa, UNICEF National Ambassador to Ethiopia. During the day, high school girls met with a number of well-known public figures and jointly explored five key themes: violence, leadership, entrepreneurship, education and healthy living.

Program 1.2: Advancing Equality for Women

Description

Through this Program, SWC supports action and innovation by investing in initiatives that work to bring about equality between women and men. The Program provides grant and contribution funding to Canadian organizations to support community-based action by carrying out projects that will lead to equality in communities across Canada. Funded projects occur at the national, regional and local levels and work to help create conditions for success for women in Canada.

Projects address the economic and social situation of women and their participation in democratic life. They are diverse in nature and scope and apply a variety of approaches and strategies to address the complexity of the issues affecting women. Specifically, the Program invests in projects that incorporate gender considerations, and increase and strengthen access to a range of opportunities, supports, information, resources, services and tools, etc. Projects involve diverse stakeholders, including women’s and community organizations, public institutions and the private sector.

The Program also facilitates collaboration, networking and partnerships to promote equality and the advancement of women in Canada. SWC facilitates networking; develops partnerships where needed to address horizontal issues impacting women and girls; shares knowledge; and assists organizations working to advance women’s equality to gain access to expertise, resources and tools.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
24,267,723 24,267,723 24,267,723 22,783,283 -1,484,440

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])

2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
36 39 3

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Women and communities have access to supports to address issues relating to equality between women and men. Percentage of projects that generate supports (e.g. resources, tools). 50% 70% of projects generated supports (e.g. resources, tools).
Communities and stakeholders have access to opportunities to advance equality between women and men Percentage of projects that facilitate opportunities (e.g. partnerships, networks, strategies). 50% 80% of projects facilitated opportunities (partnerships, networks, strategies).

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014-15, SWC provided $19, 033,332 (including a transfer of $83,332 from Justice Canada) to support 318 projects to address barriers that prevent women from reaching their full potential. Of these projects, 40 were completed, 210 were in progress and 68 were approved for funding during the reporting year.

In the reporting year, the Program achieved its expected results, providing women and communities access to supports, such as resources and tools to address issues relating to equality between women and men. Key results included increased awareness about issues impacting women, leadership skills among women and girls, and effective partnerships with stakeholders, such as service providers and the public and private sectors. The Program’s interventions focused on the Agency’s key priorities as follows:

Promoting economic opportunities for women

Approximately 48% of SWC’s projects focused on this key priority. Through these projects, partnerships have been created between organizations working with women and industry and professional associations, trade unions, and training institutes, contributing to the development of tools and resources that will increase opportunities for women in entrepreneurship, science, and technology professions and skilled trades. Some examples include:

  • In Windsor-Essex County, a women’s community based training organization partnered with young women and stakeholders, including 30 local employers, to identify the key barriers to women’s participation in non-traditional fields of employment. Specifically, employment, training and education opportunities were explored in various sectors to support young women entering into science, technology, engineering and mathematics occupations. As a result of this project, many of the partners made a commitment to hiring young women.
  • In Newfoundland and Labrador, community-based organizations worked with a wide range of partners to develop effective recruitment and retention tools for both educational institutions and industry stakeholders in the trades and technology sectors. Through this project, industry and educational partners increased their understanding of the value and benefits of addressing diversity and gender barriers in the trades, technology and operations fields, and became better equipped to manage the recruitment and retention of women in male-dominated fields.

SWC also launched calls for project proposals to promote economic opportunities for women, focusing on promoting opportunities for entrepreneurial and professional women, advancing women through mentorship and sponsorship, and enhancing their financial preparedness. Through these calls, new projects will be implemented and their results monitored over the next two to three fiscal years.

Addressing violence against women and girls

In the reporting year, approximately 40% of supported projects addressed the issue of violence against women and girls. These projects contribute to creating or strengthening much needed partnerships between service organizations for women victims of violence and institutions such as the police and social and health services in order to improve women’s access to the help and services they require. They also work to raise awareness of the consequences of violence against women and girls, and develop tools to prevent and reduce its incidence. Examples include:

  • To assist women in Yukon’s Watson Lake area transition to violence-free lives, a partnership was created among key stakeholders, including Aboriginal and northern women, law enforcement officials and service providers. Through this partnership, a formal protocol was developed between the local RCMP and Aboriginal women’s organization, setting out responsibilities, expectations and benchmarks to increase access to appropriate services and supports for women who are at risk of violence.
  • To respond effectively to the needs of immigrant and refugee women affected by family violence in Regina, community-based agencies that work in the areas of family violence, settlement and policing developed a protocol for organizations that work with victims of violence. The protocol includes procedures, policies, and training modules and provides a formal mechanism for organizations to work together to meet the specific needs of women who are newcomers. It will promote consistency across systems and agencies in both the identification of and response to violence. The protocol is now being used by several agencies in Saskatchewan and has been embedded in their intake and assessment mechanisms.

SWC also launched a call for proposals on ending violence against women and girls. Approved projects will be implemented and their results monitored over the next two to three fiscal years.

Increasing representation of women in leadership and decision-making roles

Approximately 12% of SWC’s supported projects addressed this key priority. These projects worked to develop tools and resources that will facilitate mentorship opportunities for girls and women and build their leadership skills, while changing policies and practices that limit women’s access to leadership positions. Examples include:

  • Through municipal council simulations, women in 12 regions of Quebec gained practical knowledge in order to engage in municipal politics. As a result, of the 30 women involved in the project, 18 declared their candidacy for the municipal elections. Partnerships within and outside of Quebec were developed and strengthened through this project and several of these partners have shown interest in adapting the model to their regions, including the Montreal City Council and the Women’s Committee of the Regional Conference of Elected Officers of Montreal, who collaborated to implement subsequent sessions with women.
  • To identify and address barriers to the civic, political and community participation of girls in South Asian and Middle Eastern communities in Edmonton and Calgary, a set of culturally sensitive intergenerational tools were developed and implemented by an organization representing Muslim women. The initiative created opportunities for dialogue among girls, community members and stakeholder organizations, enhancing understanding of the issue, establishing partnerships and increasing engagement of community members.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are Management and Oversight Services, Communications Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Materiel Services, Acquisition Services, and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those provided to a specific program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,203,107 3,203,107 3,772,944 5,337,769 2,134,662

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
43 42 -1

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014-15, SWC continued to enable the modernization of the workplace in implementing mobility of employees throughout the organization by providing Wi-Fi to headquarters employees and laptops to all employees. Videoconferencing through the Microsoft Lync software was also given to all employees, enabling them to connect remotely with SWC colleagues.

With the new technology in place, employees connect, communicate and collaborate in a more efficient way. These initiatives were in line with SWC’s Blueprint 2020 Implementation Plan for the priority area of Workplace tools and processes.

Through the LEAN exercise, some internal services were improved by reducing the time taken to complete some information technology and finance processes.

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