2017–18 Departmental Plan

ISSN 2371-7939

Minister’s message

Honourable Maryam Monsef, P.C., M.P. Minister of Status of Women

Our 2017–18 Departmental Plan provides parliamentarians and Canadians with information on what we do and the results we are trying to achieve during the upcoming year. To improve reporting to Canadians, we are introducing a new, simplified report to replace the Report on Plans and Priorities.

The title of the report has been changed to reflect its purpose: to communicate our annual performance goals and the financial and human resources forecast to deliver those results. The report has also been restructured to tell a clearer, more straightforward and balanced story of the actual results we are trying to achieve, while continuing to provide transparency on how tax payers’ dollars will be spent. We describe our programs and services for Canadians, our priorities for 2017–18, and how our work will fulfill our departmental mandate commitments and the government’s priorities.

As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of our country’s founding, Canadians can take pride in the decades of success we’ve had moving closer to gender equality. But our work is far from complete. Overcoming gender inequality will remain a challenge, but with leadership, persistence and advocacy, we can ensure that women and girls in Canada can achieve their full potential.

One year into its mandate, the federal government has demonstrated its commitment to gender equality. For the first time, the Federal Cabinet is gender-balanced and the Minister for the Status of Women is a full Minister. As the primary federal agency responsible for advancing equality between women and men, Status of Women Canada (SWC) continues to make progress toward addressing gender-based violence, improving the economic security of women and girls, and supporting their advancement in leadership roles.

Following extensive public consultations with Canadians in 2016, the government will launch a comprehensive Federal Strategy to Address Gender-based Violence in 2017. Led by Status of Women Canada, the Strategy will involve collaboration with the provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples and key stakeholders across the country. It will focus on prevention, aim to address the root causes of gender-based violence, and enhance our knowledge of why gender-based violence occurs in the first place. It will also provide expert support to federal partners to deliver trauma-informed and gender-sensitive training to front-line federal law enforcement officers, increase the availability of shelter for those fleeing violence, and ensure that federally regulated workplaces are free from harassment and sexual violence.

This government recognizes that its own initiatives can and must contribute more to advancing gender equality. In this respect, SWC will work to strengthen gender-based analysis within federal departments to ensure that the Government of Canada’s policies, programs and services are developed through consideration of gender and other identity factors. SWC will support the Government of Canada’s progressive international agenda that prioritizes gender equality through work in key bilateral and multilateral forums, like the United Nations.

Supporting the advancement of women in leadership roles is essential to promoting a fair and democratic society and an inclusive economy. Bringing balance to gender representation on corporate boards and in executive roles brings diversity of thought and skills to corporate Canada, which SWC will continue to promote in 2017-18 as a means to keep Canadian businesses competitive both domestically and globally. SWC will also support projects that encourage balanced representation of women and girls in political and community-based leadership roles, and will recognize the contributions of outstanding Canadian women in advancing gender equality.

Too many Canadian women and girls continue to live in poverty, unable to reach their full social and economic potential. The persistent wage gap between women and men is one of the fundamental inequalities that women experience, despite strong performance in post-secondary education and the labour market. In 2017-18, SWC will work with federal colleagues and provincial and territorial counterparts to improve our common knowledge of the wage gap and develop evidence-based strategies to address this issue.

Everyone has a role to play in advancing gender equality. I encourage you to continue mobilizing support for gender equality and social progress by engaging Canadians. This is how we will move ahead as a country. I know if we keep working together, we will make even more progress for women and girls, and build a healthier, more inclusive society that we want to leave as a legacy to our children and grandchildren.



The Honourable Maryam Monsef, P.C.M.P. 

Plans at a glance

In 2017-18, the programs of SWC will continue to promote and advance equality between women and men in Canada, striving to fulfill commitments set out by the Prime Minister in the Mandate Letter to the Minister of Status of WomenFootnote i. By providing advice and expertise, actively promoting gender equality, and engaging with Canadians and stakeholders, SWC will build awareness and knowledge of gender equality issues among Canadians, and with international partners, in support of the gender equality goals of the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable DevelopmentFootnote ii. Within federal organizations, SWC will lead in building capacity to systematically integrate gender considerations in the development, delivery and assessment of legislation, policies and programs. Through its program of grants and contributions SWC will work with stakeholders to invest strategically in solutions that address systemic barriers to equality for women. In 2017-18, SWC will focus on four priorities.

Addressing Violence against Women and Girls

Implement a comprehensive federal strategy to address gender-based violence (GBV)

Invest, through grants and contributions, in projects that address systemic barriers and target specific issues such as the causes of violence against women and girls

Support federal partners’ initiatives to address violence against  Indigenous women and girls

Support federal partners’ initiatives related to housing for those fleeing violence, and training for public safety officials

Work with Statistics Canada to fill urgent gaps in the knowledge base of the nature and extent of violence against women and girls

Develop and disseminate new knowledge on the experiences of survivors of gender-based violence and the effectiveness of prevention programs

Promote action and social change through  commemorative events such as the 16 Days of Activism on Gender-based Violence

Strengthening the Implementation of Gender-based Analysis Plus

Implement the Government of Canada’s Action Plan on Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+), in collaboration with central agency partners and all federal departments

Expand interactive online GBA+ tools and training

Develop sector-specific training for clusters of federal departments

Support the improvement of GBA+ in all Cabinet proposals and in future GBA+s of the federal Budget, and support the inclusion of a GBA+ lens in departmental plans and reports on results

Host a national roundtable on GBA+ to identify and share best practices

Monitor and report on the implementation of GBA+ within the Government of Canada

Increasing the Representation of Women in Leadership Roles

Invest, through grants and contributions, in projects to engage 150 women leaders across the country to promote collaborative action

Encourage the private and public sectors to promote more women in senior level positions within their organizations

Promote women’s leadership through ongoing commemorative events such as Persons’ Day and the International Women’s Day

Promoting Women’s Economic Security and Prosperity

Work with federal partners to address the gender wage gap by: supporting the implementation of the National Early Learning and Childcare Framework and the National Housing Strategy; supporting the development of proactive pay equity legislation; and reviewing available gender statistics for women in under-represented fields

Collaborate with provincial and territorial governments to identify and define key indicators to best measure the economic situation of women

Invest through grants and contributions to support projects that address systemic barriers to increase or strengthen women’s economic security and prosperity

For more information on the Status of Women Canada’s plans, priorities and the planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

The Office of the Co-ordinator, Status of Women, known as Status of Women Canada (SWC), is a federal government agency that promotes equality between women and men in all aspects of Canadian life. The mandate of SWC is “to coordinate policy with respect to the status of women and administer related programs” (1976).

SWC is responsible for exercising leadership and working in partnership to promote and advance equality by: supporting action that will lead to equality by helping to create conditions for success for women and girls in Canada; providing expert advice on gender equality and Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) in the development of effective programs, policies and legislation for all Canadians; promoting commemorative dates related to women and girls in Canada; and supporting Canada’s efforts to meet international obligations.

SWC works to promote and advance equality for women and girls, focusing its efforts in three areas: improving women’s and girls’ economic security and prosperity; ending violence against women and girls; and supporting the advancement and increased representation of women and girls in leadership and decision-making roles. While SWC focuses on these three areas, the agency is able to address specific issues, such as gender-based violence, the economic security and prosperity of women in rural and remote communities, and women’s full participation in Canada’s democratic and public life.

Mandate and role

SWC is the primary federal agency responsible for supporting the Government’s obligations and commitments to achieve equality for all Canadian women and girls. Gender equality issues permeate every aspect of society whether in economic, political, social, scientific or cultural domains, and as such, gender equality contributes to nation-building.

Other federal departments and the governments of the provinces and territories have responsibility for delivering programs and services directly to women and girls. The agency focuses its efforts on building awareness, knowledge and capacity in order to bring about institutional and systemic changes aligned with Government of Canada responsibilities and priorities. To accomplish this, the agency collaborates with a wide range of organizations, key stakeholders in all levels of government as well as the private and voluntary sectors.

As the Government of Canada’s centre of expertise on gender equality issues, SWC is a knowledge broker and facilitator; the agency offers input, advice and strategic support to other federal government departments and agencies, conducts policy analysis, and makes strategic interventions at both the domestic and international levels.

One of SWC’s key responsibilities is to help build capacity and tools to foster the full integration of GBA+ across Government. GBA+ takes into account gender and other identity factors (such as age, education, language, geography, culture and income) to assess the potential impacts of initiatives on diverse groups of women and men. Integrating a robust GBA+ in the development, delivery and assessment of legislation, policies, programs, services and other initiatives is crucial to ensure that they work to advance gender equality. In partnership with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) and the Privy Council Office (PCO), SWC also monitors the implementation of the Government’s commitment to GBA+ across federal departments and agencies.

Through the Women’s Program, SWC provides financial support to communities and stakeholders that work to foster the type of system-level changes that advance equality between women and men, and have a clear potential for making a difference in the lives of women and girls in Canada.

To raise awareness of gender equality issues in Canada, past achievements, and the work that remains, SWC promotes commemorative dates such as: International Women’s Day (March 8), Women’s History Month (October), the International Day of the Girl (October 11), Persons Day (October 18) and the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women (December 6).

For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report. For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada’s websiteFootnote iii.

Operating context

SWC operates in an evolving context that impacts the social, cultural and economic barriers and opportunities for Canadian women and girls.

Canada has made progress toward the promotion and advancement of gender equality in Canada; however, its performance is also marked by a slow pace, persistent gaps and disparity among women of diverse backgrounds.

  • Women experience more violent crime overall than men and are seven times more likely to experience sexual assault, yet only fewer than 4% of estimated sexual assaults are reported to police. Indigenous women are three times more likely to experience violence than non-Indigenous women, and women living north of 60 report even higher levels of violence.
  • Within the federal sphere, women represent 50% of Cabinet appointments, 35% of senior appointments to crown corporations and federal boards, and around 46% of all senior executive positions.
  • A significant wage gap persists in Canada - women earn about 74% of the wages of men working full-time, full year. Women continue to do more unpaid work, including caring for children, domestic work, and high intensity work such as caring for a senior. Over 13% of women live in poverty overall, with 30% of indigenous women and 36% of single mothers experiencing poverty.
  • In the private sector, women remain significantly under-represented in leadership positions at all levels; while women represent over 47% of the labour force in Canada, less than 5% of CEOs are women. 22% of board members in the banking sector are women, but in the mining and engineering sectors, less than 10% of board members are women.
  • The World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report (2016)Footnote iv notes “uneven progress at best” among 144 countries; Canada is ranked in 35th place, a standing that needs improvement.

Addressing these persistent gender inequalities requires the active and sustained engagement of all – citizens, communities, different levels of government and key stakeholders – and cannot be achieved by SWC alone. As such, SWC is reliant on the efforts of a wide range of partners, with gender equality sometimes being only one among their priorities. Such interdependence creates a potential risk for the Agency’s achievement of its planned outcomes. To mitigate this risk, the Agency continually engages key players, facilitates collaboration and leverages strategic partnerships with other federal departments, other levels of government, and civil society organizations working on gender equality. SWC also focuses its efforts on key priority areas where there is a clear federal role, and where the federal government can make a difference.

In the past year, the Government of Canada has made gender equality a priority. As such, it has undertaken initiatives to address persistent gender inequalities, including by conducting a national engagement process on the development of a federal strategy to address gender-based violence, and delivering an Action Plan to implement GBA+ across federal departments and agencies. The Government’s equality agenda creates both opportunities and risks for SWC. Opportunities include renewed engagement with stakeholders at all levels, a commitment by the Government to strive for gender parity in Governor in Council appointments, and a new commitment to the implementation of GBA+ across government. Risks for the Agency relate to demonstrating results in response to the high expectations that these commitments are creating among Canadians and in the women’s movement in particular. SWC will continue to build the capacity of its workforce for program delivery, data collection, research, analysis, policy development, performance measurement, and evaluation to deliver on its initiatives and demonstrate their impact and effectiveness.

Key risks

Risks Risk response strategy Link to the department’s Programs Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities
Initiatives are collaborative
To achieve its objectives, SWC depends on the collaboration of and action by citizens, communities, different levels of government, and the private and voluntary sectors. SWC has limited levers to require that measures to achieve gender equality are undertaken, and cannot ensure that these measures will be effective. Given that SWC relies on effectively influencing others, there is a risk that SWC will be challenged to fulfill its priorities, particularly a comprehensive gender-based violence strategy.

At the federal level:

  • Adopt a whole-of-government approach for key initiatives including shared performance indicators whenever possible.
  • Strengthen requirements for the federal government to take gender equality into consideration, including through Gender-Based Analysis Plus.
  • Leverage existing policy and legislative initiatives to integrate gender considerations.

Among stakeholders outside of the federal government:

  • Engage and collaborate with provincial, territorial and municipal governments.
  • Leverage Women’s Program funding to require collaborative action, bringing together communities, gender equality advocates and the private and voluntary sectors.
P.1.1

P.1.2

Government of Canada Outcome:

Income security and employment for Canadians

SWC priorities:

  • Addressing violence against women and girls
  • Promoting Economic Opportunities for Women
  • Women in Leadership
  • Improved  Gender-based Analysis Plus
Social Change can be difficult to measure
SWC seeks to fulfill economic and social objectives in broad public policy areas related to gender quality, such as reducing the wage gap between men and women, increasing the number of women in leadership positions, and ending gender-based violence. Consequently, results can be a challenge to measure, to attribute to SWC and to report to Canadians. As a result, there is a risk that the effectiveness of the SWC’s program, policy and communications interventions would not be well demonstrated.
  • Develop staff capacity, frameworks, tools and systems to collect data, undertake research, and monitor, analyze and report on performance.
  • Engage in regular formal consultations and informal discussions with Canadians, and remain focussed on delivering on key priorities and communicating results to Canadians.
P.1.1

P.1.2

Government of Canada Outcome:

A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government

Planned results

Programs

Program 1.1: Strategic Advice, Expertise and Promotion of Gender Equality

Description

As the Government of Canada’s centre of expertise on women’s equality issues, SWC helps the government meet its domestic and international obligations and commitments to gender equality. Through its communication and commemoration activities, SWC raises Canadians’ understanding and knowledge of gender equality issues and encourages them to engage in efforts to make advances in this area. SWC also plays a lead role in building the capacity of federal organizations to use GBA+ to develop and implement policies, programs and initiatives that will address gender inequalities in their areas of responsibility. SWC provides strategic policy research, analysis and advice to the Government as a whole and to other key partners and stakeholders on numerous issues aligned with its three priority areas of ending violence against women and girls, supporting the advancement and increased representation of women and girls in leadership and decision-making roles, and improving women’s and girls’ economic security and prosperity. SWC fosters the development of new data and innovative research, explores gaps and emerging issues, and encourages knowledge transfer on ways to address gender inequalities. Through its international engagement, SWC influences international outcome documents, agreements and resolutions to ensure that they contain strong commitments to gender equality and address specific issues relevant to the Canadian context. 

Planning highlights
Addressing Violence against Women and Girls

Gender-based violence remains an overwhelming barrier to equality. Fear for one’s personal safety, violence at home or in the workplace, sexual harassment whether in person or through cyber tools, all create barriers to women’s full participation in all aspects of society. As an advanced and prosperous country, Canada can and needs to do better to address the continued violence against women and girls. As such, in partnership with other federal departments, other levels of government, and civil society, SWC will, in 2017-18:

  • Launch and lead a multi-pronged federal strategy to prevent and reduce gender-based violence to:
    • Coordinate efforts by all stakeholders – federal partners, other levels of government and civil society – and experimenting with innovative approaches to develop evidence-based practices wherever possible, so that actions are complementary and contribute to a common goal;
    • Continue to support federal initiatives to address violence against Indigenous women and girls;
    • Develop new tools to measure experiences of gender-based violence in different contexts, and support the development of user-driven knowledge products on the state of GBV and promising practices to prevent and address it;
    • Establish a common framework for monitoring and reporting gender-based violence in collaboration with the provinces and territories, to improve accountability and support evidence-based decisions;
    • Support initiatives to provide gender and trauma-sensitive training for federal front-line law enforcement officers;
    • Support initiatives to ensure that the federal workplace is free from harassment and sexual violence;
    • Support initiatives to provide shelters and to enhance Canada’s network of shelters and transition houses for individuals fleeing violence; and
    • Build awareness and calls for action through commemorative events, notably the 16 Days of Activism and the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women.

These activities are expected to contribute to increased knowledge, awareness and activism, as well as well-coordinated actions among partners and stakeholders, and a measurable understanding and reduction of gender-based violence over time.

Strengthening implementation of Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

When federal departments and agencies apply a gender lens to the development, implementation and assessment of their legislation, policies, initiatives and programs, inequalities based on gender and other identity factors such as education, language, geography, culture and income can be recognized and addressed. SWC supports efforts across government to integrate GBA+ through the collection of gender specific data, development and dissemination of tools and training and through the monitoring of GBA+ implementation. Working to achieve this objective, in 2017-18, and in line with the 2015 report of the Auditor GeneralFootnote v on gender-based analysis SWC will:

  • Work with federal departments and agencies to implement the Action Plan (2016-2020)Footnote vi to improve GBA+ as a rigorous practice across the federal government;
  • Expand online, interactive GBA+ training for federal officials, Parliamentarians and the public;
  • Develop GBA+ training targeted to federal public servants working in the similar areas, such as security;
  • Leverage digital technologies to deliver “micro-learning moments” to enhance GBA+ knowledge both inside of government and among all Canadians; 
  • Support the improvement of GBA+ in all Cabinet proposals and in future GBA+s of the federal Budget, and support the inclusion of a GBA+ lens in departmental plans and reports on results;
  • Track and report on progress in the implementation of GBA+ in federal departments and agencies.

These activities are expected to contribute to increased awareness, and the identification and reduction of systemic barriers to gender equality in the federal government’s service to Canadians.

Increasing the representation of Women in Leadership Roles

All Canadians benefit when women are engaged in the democratic process and in leading our nation, whether as elected officials, on public or private sector boards, or as senior executives. Greater representation of women in various types of leadership roles contributes to a stronger Canadian society and economy. SWC supports efforts to increase the representation of women across private and public spheres, including executive and board roles, community-based leadership and democratic participation. Working to achieve this objective in 2017-18, SWC will:

  • Strengthen relationships with public and private sectors to advance women’s leadership and gender balance on boards, in senior executive ranks, and in decision-making roles;
  • Raise awareness and advocate for women’s democratic leadership through commemorative events including Persons Day, International Women’s Day and the International Day of the Girl;
  • Work within key international forums such as the United Nations and the Organization of American States’ Inter-American Commission on Women to ensure that women’s leadership is a key priority; and
  • Work with Statistics Canada to improve data on women’s leadership, focusing on women in politics and business.

These activities are expected to contribute to an increase in the number of women appointed to executive positions and boards, more evidence-based policy making regarding women in leadership roles, and greater awareness of the contribution of women leaders.

Promoting Women’s Economic Security and Prosperity

Women in Canada, as a whole, are performing well when measured against international counterparts. However, many women in Canada experience a range of barriers to economic prosperity. Racialized women, Indigenous women, women with disabilities and other marginalized groups of women experience these barriers more keenly. In order to support more Canadian women to enter the middle class, it is necessary to better understand the persistent wage gap between women and men. SWC’s work to increase women’s economic security and prosperity recognizes that the gender wage gap and the factors that contribute to it must be addressed in order to promote greater inclusion of women in the economy. Working to achieve this objective in 2017-18, SWC will:

  • Engage with key federal government departments address the gender wage gap and better promote women’s economic inclusion and participation by: supporting the implementation of the National Early Learning and Childcare Framework and the National Housing Strategy; supporting the development of proactive pay equity legislation; and reviewing available gender statistics for women in under-represented fields;
  • Work with the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Forum of Ministers Responsible for the Status of Women to develop a common understanding of the gender wage gap and develop Economic Gender Equality Indicators to identify key gaps and measure progress. 

These activities are expected to result in the identification of gaps in federal programs and policies that create economic and labour market barriers for women, measures to respond to those gaps, and the development of ongoing performance measures to assess the impact of federal efforts. Enhanced collaboration with provincial and territorial governments will contribute to measures to understand and reduce the gender wage gap as it presents in different areas of Canada.

To deliver activities in these four areas, the Agency will invest $3.15M in 2017-2018. In addition, 24 full-time equivalent staff will be involved in delivering initiatives under this Program.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Through SWC leadership, key stakeholders have access to advice and information on issues relating to equality between women and men and boys and girls. (Key stakeholders include federal organizations, provinces, territories, civil society and the general public) Number of SWC-led interventions that provide advice and information 10 March 31, 2018 5 5 6
Through the provision of SWC expertise, federal government officials and key stakeholders have increased knowledge of GBA+. (Key stakeholders include representatives from provinces, territories, civil society and the general public) Percentage of respondents that indicate their knowledge of GBA+ has increased following GBA+ training/event 75% March 31, 2018 90% 93% 86%
Celebration and commemoration events/activities aimed at advancing equality for women and girls are held in Canada Number of SWC-led celebration and commemoration/activities held in Canada 10 March 31, 2018 n/a n/a n/a
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
3,153,970 3,153,970 3,153,970 3,153,970
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
24 24 24

Program 1.2: Advancing Equality for Women

Description

SWC’s grant and contribution funding to non-profit and other organizations aims to create conditions of success for women’s economic security, social well-being, and participation in democratic life. Funded projects apply a variety of strategies with an emphasis on addressing the underlying systemic barriers impeding women’s progress and advancement. The agency also facilitates collaboration, networking, partnerships and knowledge sharing amongst organizations working to advance equality for women in order to maximize the impacts of its funding.

Planning highlights
Strategic Investment

SWC’s program of grants and contributions is an important tool for implementing its priorities. Through strategic investments, SWC supports projects that develop solutions to systemic barriers faced by women. Working to achieve this objective in 2017-18, SWC will:

  • Support local projects to engage 150 women leaders across the country to promote collaborative action;
  • Support projects that will address violence against women and girls, including those that target specific issues such as the root causes of violence;
  • Support projects that will promote economic development and advancement for women and girls, and create sustainable opportunities for their economic security and prosperity;
  • Support projects that will increase the representation of women in leadership and decision-making roles, recognizing the important role of advocacy in furthering gender equality goals; and
  • Review elements of the Women’s Program, building on the findings from the summative evaluation of the Women’s Program in 2016-17, to ensure investments continue to deliver the maximum impact.
Engagement and Collaboration

Funding strategies and initiatives allow SWC to build partnerships and engage communities and stakeholders who have an interest, direct or indirect, in advancing gender equality. A collaborative approach helps ensure that issues impacting women are widely recognized and addressed, increasing ownership and the sustainability of initiatives across Canada. SWC works in collaboration with key stakeholders, taking into consideration ongoing and emerging issues affecting women. Working to achieve this objective in 2017-18, SWC will:

  • Support projects that facilitate the networking of organizations with a shared goal, to foster a more coordinated and comprehensive approach to addressing issues impacting women in Canada;
  • Support a pan-Canadian network of women leaders and equality-seeking organizations to promote collaborative action to advance gender equality in Canada; and
  • Focus on developing and strengthening partnerships, working horizontally with federal organizations, other levels of government and stakeholders.
Knowledge Brokering

SWC grows and shares knowledge developed through its research and as a result of its investment program, and provides expertise on longstanding and emerging issues impacting women. Working to achieve this objective in 2017-18, SWC will:

  • Extract and disseminate knowledge of promising practices flowing from funded projects;
  • Continue to create opportunities for dialogue and exchange by piloting an online platform allowing funding recipients and other stakeholders to exchange knowledge and expertise, working to grow the platform and explore sustainability strategies; and
  • Expand a 2016 pilot project to use an innovative software tool to measure the social impact of funded projects by streamlining the collection and analysis of common metrics.

These activities respond to recommendations from the 2011-2012 evaluation of the Women’s Program. They are expected to result in expanded partnerships between local, regional and national actors capable of making a difference on gender equality, better knowledge of effective policies and interventions, and improved analysis of the impacts of its investments and initiatives.

To deliver these activities, SWC will invest $28.8M, of which $20.6M will be in the form of grants and contributions to support community-based organizations to deliver projects on priority issues; and $8.2M will be in operations funds to support the delivery of the program. SWC will require 55 full-time equivalents to deliver these activities in the National Capital Region and in five regional offices.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Women and communities have access to supports to address issues relating to equality between women and men Percentage of projects that generate supports (e.g. resources, tools). 80% March 31, 2018 n/a 70%  90%
Communities and stakeholders have access to opportunities to advance equality between women and men Percentage of projects that facilitate opportunities (e.g. partnerships, networks, strategies) 80% March 31, 2018 90% 80%  85%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
28,798,443 28,798,443 28,110,492 27,809,524
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
28,798,443 28,798,443 28,110,492 27,806,524

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

As a small federal agency, SWC seeks flexible, innovative options for delivering its programs and building the skills, knowledge and capacity of its workforce. By providing employees with new professional development opportunities, SWC will continue to build a capable, confident and high-performing workforce. 

In 2017-18, SWC will undertake an initiative whereby employees accept short-term assignments or “micro-missions” within the agency or at other federal departments, which will allow employees to benefit from experience in other areas within the agency and across the federal government. SWC will also expand its initiatives to increase awareness of and promote mental health among its workforce, and support a healthy and compassionate work environment.

To deliver these activities, SWC will invest $6M in operations funds to support the delivery of the programs. SWC will require 57 full-time equivalents for these activities in the National Capital Region including the Minister’s office.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
6,025,008 6,025,008 6,025,008 6,025,008
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
57 57 57

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Budgetary planning summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2014–15
Expenditures
2015–16
Expenditures
2016–17
Forecast spending
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
Strategic Advice, Expertise and Promotion of Gender Equality 2,004,692 1,852,185 2,274,114 3,153,970 3,153,970 3,153,970 3,153,970
Advancing Equality for Women 22,783,283 22,459,620 25,024,768 28,798,443 28,798,443 28,110,492 27,809,524
Subtotal 24,787,975 24,311,805 27,298,882 31,952,413 31,952,413 31,264,462 30,963,494
Internal Services 5,337,769 5,230,596 9,003,217 6,025,008 6,025,008 6,025,008 6,025,008
Total 30,125,744 29,542,401 36,302,099 37,977,421 37,977,421 37,289,470 36,988,502

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Programs and Internal Services
(full-time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2014–15
Full-time equivalents
2015–16
Full-time equivalents
2016–17
Forecast
full-time equivalents
2017–18
Planned
full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned
full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned
full-time equivalents
Strategic Advice, Expertise and Promotion of Gender Equality 17 17 20 24 24 24
Advancing Equality for Women 39 38 44 55 55 55
Subtotal 56 55 64 79 79 79
Internal Services 42 44 52 57 57 57
Total 98 99 116 136 136 136

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Departmental Spending Trend Graph (thousands of dollars)
2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 150 945 1,328 1,476 1,386 1,085
Statutory 1,204 1,229 1,601 1,789 1,790 1,791
Voted 28,772 27,368 33,373 34,712 34,113 34,113
Total 30,126 29,542 36,302 37,977 37,289 36,989

Estimates by vote

For information on the Status of Women’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2017–18 Main EstimatesFootnote vii.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the SWC’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Status of Women's websiteFootnote viii.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2016–17
Forecast results
2017–18
Planned results
Difference
(2017–18 Planned results minus 2016–17 Forecast results)
Total expenses 38,312 39,986 1,674
Total revenues 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 38,312 39,986 1,674

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister(s): The Honourable Maryam Monsef

Institutional head: Meena Ballantyne

Ministerial portfolio: Canadian Heritage

Enabling instrument(s): Order in Council (1976-779)

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1976

Other:

Reporting framework

SWC’s Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) of record for 2017–18 are shown below:

1. Strategic Outcome: Equality between women and men is promoted and advanced in Canada

  • 1.1 Program: Strategic Advice, Expertise and Promotion of Gender Equality
  • 1.2 Program: Advancing Equality for Women

Internal Services

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on SWC’s websiteFootnote ix.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax ExpendituresFootnote x. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

For financial information, contact:

Anik Lapointe 
Chief Financial Officer and Director Corporate Services Directorate 
Telephone: 819-420-6825 
Fax:  819-420-6906 
E-mail: Anik.Lapointe@cfc-swc.gc.ca

For other information, contact:

Daniel Sansfaçon 
Director, Research, Evaluation and Planning 
Policy and External Relations Directorate
Telephone: 819-420-6855 
Fax:  819-420-6906 
E-mail: Daniel.Sansfacon@cfc-swc.g.ca

Appendix A: Definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
A horizontal initiative is one in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (e.g. by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
plans (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priorities (priorité)
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Endnotes

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